Its name says it all. The Hollywood 300C was built as the ultimate luxury car for the guy who has everything. Modeled after the limos from the 1920's, the car is a modified Chrysler 300 sporting a longer wheel base, 22” wheels, suicide doors, and a luxurious leather interior with two 14” TVs with a compartment for the requisite champagne. Backseat passengers have the best advantage as the rear cabin of the Hollywood is fully enclosed, while the driver and the front-seat passenger sit in a convertible-like setting reminiscent of the coach-styled vehicles of the 20's. Basically, they're left to the mercy of the elements. Purely built for the “Wow” factor, this car will never see the light of day.

Making its debut in 1970, this car definitely turned heads. Modeled from a racing car’s chassis, the box-shaped frame sets this car apart from the pack. Via 24 holes inserted into its hood there's a clear view of the car's engine. With a sliding roof that offered easy access to the cabin, this Modulo was a true car of the future. So what was the Achilles’ heel? Since the wheels were built into the car’s frame, this Ferrari could only be driven in one direction – straight.

The second incarnation of the out of this world Pivo debuted in Tokyo in 2007. The Pivo 2 combines eco-friendly ethics with fun, and looks like something ripped from the pages of a manga. Using “by-wire technologies” and a variable geometry system named the “Metamo” system this car has some serious moves. Its cabin rotates 360 degrees, which eliminates the need for backing up and it also makes parallel parking a breeze. Propelling it even further into the realm of sci-fi is a robotic agent that communicates with the car's driver. A cross between R2-D2 and Bobby McFarrin, the robotic agent makes sure you’re never traveling alone. Facial and vocal monitoring technology enables the car to access your mood and act accordingly. If you’re in a bad mood the robotic agent will utilize one of its preprogrammed phrases in an attempt to lighten the mood, including “Don’t worry. Relax.”

A masterpiece of design and innovation, the 1938 Phantom Corsair could have been one of the most popular cars of its time. Sleek and curvaceous, this big-bodied beauty could seat up to six adults comfortably. It was equipped with an early version of the air bag in the form of a crash padded dashboard and a climate control system. It also featured a Lycoming V8 engine under the hood, which made the Phantom a real speed demon, able to reach speeds of up to 115 mph. Destined to go into production as a limited edition, plans were eventually halted with the death of designer Rust Heinz.

Mazda continues to push the boundaries of design with its 2007 Taiki Concept vehicle. The fourth in its “flow” design series, the lines on the car’s silvery chassis draw from the natural flow lines found in both wind and water. Continuing the water theme, the glass canopy is designed in the shape of a teardrop. But this car is more than just another pretty face. Featuring a next generation rotary engine, this sports coupe can really tear up the track. The Taiki may be a showstopper when it comes to design, but its exaggerated body and rear wheels may be too extreme for mainstream drivers, which could hurt its chances of ever making it to production.

The single seat 1990 Daihatsu Trek was perfectly built for transcendental wannabes ala “Into the Wild." This mini houseboat on wheels was designed to tackle rough terrain with its off-road wheels and front winch. The top half of the car folded down, revealing a flat deck where one could sleep under the stars. Bad weather? No worries…a cover was included to fit over the deck. Theoretically a good idea, it’s unclear why the Trek’s journey ended on the drawing board. Maybe it was its unappealing exterior.

An 80’s baby, the Ford Cockpit was designed for city life. A three-wheeled vehicle, this “Tron” fugitive borrowed many features from motorcycles, like a passenger seat directly behind the driver's. Powered by a motorcycle engine, the Cockpit was extremely fuel friendly, averaging 75 MPG. Its fuel efficiency was attributed to its plastic body -- nice for fuel consumption, but a tear up in the event of a collision. It's probably why the Cockpit never saw the inside of a car dealership.

Finally, the world’s first huggably soft automobile! Honda’s 2007 PUYO concept car is both a pet and a means of transport. Billed as the car without edges, the PUYO's exterior is covered in a soft gel making it soft to the touch. Besides causing an irresistible urge to poke it, the gel is designed to serve as extra cushioning in the case of an accident. Instead of a traditional steering wheel, the car uses a joystick, sort of like a mobile Tamagotchi. Meant to convey feelings of safety, friendliness, and cleanliness, one can’t help feeling a little weirded out by the PUYO. Sit PUYO, sit. Good car.

 

Eight Concept Cars That'll Never See Production

Sure, concept cars feature dreamy style and technological innovations that we'd love to see roll out in manufacturer's lineups. Unfortunately, safety, practicality, and cost often prohibit these cars from ending up in anyone's driveway. These are the ones we'd like to see on the road.

Its name says it all. The Hollywood 300C was built as the ultimate luxury car for the guy who has everything. Modeled after the limos from the 1920's, the car is a modified Chrysler 300 sporting a longer wheel base, 22” wheels, suicide doors, and a luxurious leather interior with two 14” TVs with a compartment for the requisite champagne. Backseat passengers have the best advantage as the rear cabin of the Hollywood is fully enclosed, while the driver and the front-seat passenger sit in a convertible-like setting reminiscent of the coach-styled vehicles of the 20's. Basically, they're left to the mercy of the elements. Purely built for the “Wow” factor, this car will never see the light of day.

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