"We started doing shows in 1998. You look around, and you realize that there are trucks and buses and the tour has a pretty large carbon footprint. So we started running our buses on biodiesel and working to buy offsets. With this year's tour, we're bringing in nonprofits. We'll see if we can up their membership or give away tickets so they can raise money. We match our audience contributions dollar for dollar, up to $2,500 per charity."

"When I took over the wetlands [a pioneering eco-minded music club in New York] in 1996, it was so hard to keep the business green. So my brother and I founded an environmental-consulting firm where we help companies such as GE and Ralph Lauren. But I wanted to go beyond the corporate world, and in 2006, I started the Green Apple festival. We use music to get people out to free events where they're going to learn something."

"In 2004, we had the NRDC do a survey of our paper practices. We started vetting paper suppliers, and we ended up saving a million dollars. We converted our video release catalog to paperless, and we plan to do the same with our audio catalog. Our eco-team looks for new challenges, such as how to switch CDs from plastic jewel cases to cardboard digipacks. We have a lot of work to do on that."

Gardner: "A lot of bands are green minded, but their actions don't match that. Reverb lays out an entire menu of options: recycling, carbon offsets, green catering. Then there are the big-ticket items, such as using biodiesel. If bands tell us what route they're taking, we'll help them find fuel on the way or arrange to have a truck go to the venue with fuel. More than 80% of a concert's CO2 footprint is from fans' commutes, so we also help set up carpooling options."

"One day, I met Zack de la Rocha of Rage Against the Machine. They were singing about the Zapatista revolution, but the message wasn't coming through. So along with Zack, I created the spitfire tour, which went to colleges with political and environmental speakers. Today, we produce events, book talent, and arrange sponsorships. Our most ambitious project is the Rothbury Festival. We're sourcing everything green, from cups and plates to food, and we're recycling and composting. We're also encouraging fans to pay an extra $3 per ticket, for carbon offsets."

Music Goes Green

"We started doing shows in 1998. You look around, and you realize that there are trucks and buses and the tour has a pretty large carbon footprint. So we started running our buses on biodiesel and working to buy offsets. With this year's tour, we're bringing in nonprofits. We'll see if we can up their membership or give away tickets so they can raise money. We match our audience contributions dollar for dollar, up to $2,500 per charity."

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