It's "The End of Television as We Know It," suggests IBM's Institute for Business Value's recent report on entertainment and media. The study reveals that 60% of respondents spend 1-4 hours a day online vs. 66% who watch 1-4 hours of TV, and 81% have watched or want to watch PC video, while 42% have watched or want to watch mobile video. Here are some of the best next generation content creators and providers.

Footnote: The IBM Institute for Business Value survey of more than 2,400 households in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Japan and Australia covered global usage and adoption of new multimedia devices and media and entertainment consumption on PCs, mobile phones, portable media players and more.

This online application brings social networking to the television watching experience, allowing users to chat and send messages to each other while they are watching shows--even sending a summary of your viewing history to your blog. Programs run from mainstream fare like Comedy Central and VH1 to more independent works like Fifth Gear (about cars) and Ginx (about video games).
http://www.joost.com

Founded in 2005, Revision 3 produces a variety of shows downloadable to both desktops and handheld devices. The shows range from a variety of topics, including "Diggnation," which explores the top links from Digg, the user-generated news site, to Photoshop tutorial show "PixelPerfect," to "The Totally Rad Show," featuring discussions on the geek culture of film, comics and video games. Most shows run on weekly or biweekly schedules.
http://www.revision3.com

Blip.tv is a video and uploading hosting service for aspiring video bloggers, and has become a network of original shows containing content from anyone who submits. With blip.tv, users can embed video players on their own Web pages and social networks. It also has a different approach to advertising - -users can integrate advertising from other outlets, or blip.tv can find someone to sponsor your show and split the revenue with you, fifty-fifty.
http://www.blip.tv

This company specializes in shows devoted to technology and computers. From Robert Scoble (who also writes for Fast Company) and his "Scoble Show" on Web tech, to "Big Picture on Security" focusing on security issues, to "Technology is Broken" which helps laypeople with technology. The network features new episodes daily.
http://www.podtech.net

GUBA offers a variety of videos, containing a mix of free user-generated videos and Hollywood films or television shows that can be purchased for $1.79 to $2.99. It also features an affiliate program, in which users can distribute GUBA, through links or an embedded player on their personal site and earn $.25 every time a new user signs-up for membership through the link.
http://www.guba.com

Dan Harmon and Rob Schrab, creators of "Heat Vision and Jack," a TV pilot that garnered a cult following, launched a short-film festival in Los Angeles in 2003. Since then, the monthly festival has gained in popularity. The audience can vote on which homegrown TV series will continue airing at the festival. Many of the festival's provocatively humorous videos appear on the website -- in such shows as "Yacht Rock," "Chad Vader," and even "Kicked in the Nuts."
http://www.channel101.com

Kyte.tv is like many other video uploading and sharing sites, but it also allows users to create live shows using a Webcam or a mobile phone's camera and then place them into personal channels. It has tools to add slideshows, polls, and other interactive shows to your channel as well. Users can e-mail photos or videos from their mobile phone to update their kyte channel. The company recently added the ability to embed the kyte player on the social network Facebook.
http://kyte.tv

From features about current events, to interviews on relevant topics, the "Daily Buzz" show covers a variety of topics ranging from the Internet to Technology to Culture. There is also a Spanish-language version available every day, "Dosis Diaria," with programming in other languages to follow soon. The site offers the videos in many formats, for computers and a variety of mobile devices.
http://dailybuzz.mobuzz.tv

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Brightcove is a software platform that enables Web publishers to create video networks on their own sites (including FastCompany.com). The Brightcove system also aggregates all of the video from its various content partners into a distribution network on its own site that is divided into channels. The network provides code for anyone to embed videos or channels on a personal Website, along with more standard tools to preview related videos or e-mail videos to friends.
http://brightcove.com

This site emerged in 2000 as a producer of humorous Flash animations. Many of these animations focused on the Mexican-wrestler-esque character Strong Bad. Later the site moved into video productions, with some featuring Strong Bad answering viewer e-mails, and other videos featuring "Teen Girl Squad," a silly and satirical look at a clique of girl friends--in the form of a hand-drawn comic book.
http://podstar.homestarrunner.com

This video network comes from a company called Azureus that created the self-titled Azureus software for users to share bittorrent files, a peer-to-peer format where users upload as they download. Vuze has both user-generated and commercially made media from the likes of BBC, Showtime, and A&E. And since Vuze uses the bittorrent format, the videos download at quick speeds.
http://www.vuze.com

Next New Networks has a dozen Websites with each featuring what they call a "micro-television network." These networks contain both network-created videos and user-submitted material. Such networks include Channel Frederator, devoted to humorous cartoons, JetSet, focusing on entertainment for young adults, and Bleacher Bloggers, which covers sports.
http://nextnewnetworks.com

From the nonprofit Participatory Culture Foundation, the Miro software is an open-source application made to play any video format online, including YouTube and Google Video's format, P2P videos over bittorrent, and HD content. Similar to iTunes or a simple RSS reader for text, Miro pulls in videos and sorts them into categories and channels, organizing downloads and video streams from different sources.
http://www.getmiro.com

Why You'll Be Watching More and More TV On Your Computer

It's "The End of Television as We Know It," suggests IBM's Institute for Business Value's recent report on entertainment and media. The study reveals that 60% of respondents spend 1-4 hours a day online vs. 66% who watch 1-4 hours of TV, and 81% have watched or want to watch PC video, while 42% have watched or want to watch mobile video. Here are some of the best next generation content creators and providers.

Footnote: The IBM Institute for Business Value survey of more than 2,400 households in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Japan and Australia covered global usage and adoption of new multimedia devices and media and entertainment consumption on PCs, mobile phones, portable media players and more.

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