Product packaging is no insignificant part of the branding process -- in a market based on consumer choice it can be crucial. Packaging is the first thing a customer interacts with: it can get a terrible product noticed or can sink a great one; it can make or break a sale. In recent years, a number of companies have engaged design firms to revamp their image, largely through redesigning their packaging in light of new and more ambitious goals. Here's an exclusive look at some of the world's most prominent brands that have recently been reinvigorated by successful packaging makeovers.

The Brand: Remrandt

The Aim: In an attempt to radically rebrand its newly acquired oral healthcare line, Johnson & Johnson created a packaging plan to achieve shelf differentiation and also to create a product that provided consumers with a meaningful experience, one that transcended the functionality with which oral healthcare had traditionally been associated.

The Strategy: The hallmark of the repackaging campaign was simplication: the new boxes were white and uncluttered. Retailers were also asked to shelf the entire brand in one location, creating a noticeable wall of white.

*Information courtesy of Laforce + Stevens.

The Brand: Dove

The Aim: Unilever brought on design firm Raison Pure to transition its image from primarily a cleansing brand to a beauty brand, and to achieve consistency amongst the various dove logos and representations globally, while simultaneously achieving differentiation in the marketplace.

The Strategy: The products were repackaged accordingly, to lend an impression of elegance and beauty rather than just convenience and cleanliness

*Information courtesy of Raison Pure.

The Brand: Herbal Essences

The Aim: P&G's global Herbal Essences brand employed LPK to help make its mark in the hair-care market and differentiate itself on the shelf.

The Strategy: The firm came up with a design from scratch that featured attention-grabbing, uncomplicated, color-coded packaging. The 2006 rebrand launch was extremely successful: three of the top five customers increased Herbal distribution by over 25% and four times as many displays were shipped versus any past launches. In the first three months, Herbal Essences experienced a 6% increase in overall volume share.

*Information courtesy of Rebrand.

The Brand: Wellington Cordage

The Aim: In order to achieve product differentiation, rope makers Wellington asked Proteus to design a rebrand, a key part of which was the repackaging of its product.

The Strategy: Based on insights that consumers were most interested in how strong the product was, Proteus created a new packaging system. It also displaced the traditional plastic bag for a branded strap, ensuring much longer lasting brand-recognition.

*Information courtesy of Proteus.

The Brand: Kleenex

The Aim: To incorporate elements of design and style into an everyday product that would take it out of the bedroom, making it suitable for the living room, and would also attract younger consumers to the brand.

The Strategy: While the original Kleenex box continues to exist, Kimberly Clark also developed an oval box in recent years. The newly designed boxes, released as holiday editions in 2005, were so successful that they ranked as the top selling facial tissues in the weeks leading up to the holiday.

*Information courtesy of Kimberly Clark.

The Brand: Millicare

The Aim: Millicare, a green friendly corporate carpet and textile maintenance franchise, was suffering from a lack of brand recognition because its presence in most offices was during off-hours. The aim was to have design firm The Moderns rebrand Millcare's image by creating a clear identity and visual presence.

The Strategy: Through a comprehensive rebranding, the agency leveraged Millicare's product packaging and vehicular facades to act as advertisements for the brand, thus achieving greater brand presence at a relatively minor expense.

*Information courtesy of Rebrand and The Moderns.

The Brand: El Palacio de Hierro

The Aim: El Palacio de Hierro, a chain of luxury department stores in Mexico, asked designers Alexander Isley revamp its image, providing the stores with consistency and brand recognition, and distinguishing the chain as an icon.

The Strategy: Alexander Isley recommended a rich golden yellow with a deep brown trim as the chain's signature color and applied it to all boxes, packaging and communication materials to provide the chain with a signature look, graphic format and color scheme. "Bags can be a huge marketing tool for a department store, yet at El Palacio de Hierro there was no consistency and as a result very little brand recognition," explained Aline Hilford, Managing Director for the agency.

*Information courtesy of Alexander Isley.

Knowing When It's Time For A Packaging Makeover

Product packaging is no insignificant part of the branding process -- in a market based on consumer choice it can be crucial. Packaging is the first thing a customer interacts with: it can get a terrible product noticed or can sink a great one; it can make or break a sale. In recent years, a number of companies have engaged design firms to revamp their image, largely through redesigning their packaging in light of new and more ambitious goals. Here's an exclusive look at some of the world's most prominent brands that have recently been reinvigorated by successful packaging makeovers.

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