40-year-old architect, David Adjaye, makes his United States debut next summer with his Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver. While other architects choose marble, maple or glass, Adjaye opts for cheap poured concrete chipboard, sawn plywood or ashphalt, and anti-graffiti paint.

"I like my clock's form and, in a digital world, its analog nature. I also like the proportion of its three colors--black, gray and red, which I use a lot in my designs."

Jennifer Siegal founded the Office of Mobile Design in Venice California, hoping to reawaken the 20th-century dream of roving homes and instant dwellings. As editor of Materials Monthly, she promotes "a future of innovative materials that are light, strong, and reusable."

"My wings are from my Halloween costume, when I dressed as the tooth fairy. They were from my 'red phase.' They are also a symbol of flight and mobility, a theme connecting many of my mobile architectural projects."

At 29, Scott Wilson gave the Swingline stapler a makeover. Since then, he's designed watches for Nike, modern children's furniture for his Ooba line, and seating for the Rem Koolhaas' Seattle Central library. Now at Motorola, Wilson will be designing wearable technologies.

"A twist on a classic, these notebooks are made by the same company that makes the normal Moleskine, but they have accordioned pages. This allows me to have a long thread of ideas and see how they progress."

New Yorkers are likely familiar with Antenna's work. They designed the transit system's ubiquitous Metrocard machines and the new look for more than 2,000 subway cars. "We're not one of those designers who force a style on every object," says Moeslinger.

"A long time ago, my cousin gave me this crystal ball to fend off the radiation that the old CRT monitors used to give off. I never believed it did, I just kept it as a good luck charm."

Antenna is the new savant of interactive design; they render complex information transparent and intuitive. Antenna redesigned data terminals at Bloomberg and created self-service kiosks for JetBlue. "The user doesn't distinguish between hardware and software," says Udagawa.

"My sketch pad is sort of like my talisman, I carry it around all the time so I can write down my ideas. I don't necessarily do that, but it gives me peace of mind that I can."

Design's Rising Stars

40-year-old architect, David Adjaye, makes his United States debut next summer with his Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver. While other architects choose marble, maple or glass, Adjaye opts for cheap poured concrete chipboard, sawn plywood or ashphalt, and anti-graffiti paint.

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