Twitter is a little bit soap-box and a little bit stand-up. It does odd things to the conventions of conversation; brevity becomes sincerity, solipsism becomes introspection, and almost everything becomes fascinating. Individual “tweets” are frequently funny and rarely as mundane as you'd think, and when you read them in succession, they coalesce into a disarmingly honest narrative that can provide more insight into an individual's life than an entire year of blogging could. No one is a more exemplary user than Twitter's co-founder himself, Evan Williams. Read his tweets and step inside the often-silly life of a Silicon Valley CEO.

Tweets don't have to exist in a vacuum; they can be inquisitive, too, inviting a volley of tweets back and forth between users.

When your tweet is aimed at another user, you denote that user by entering their name after the @ symbol. That allows viewers to link back to the other user, and read the tweets like a conversation.

Because users can tweet on both computers and mobile phones, plenty of twittering is done on the go. Note the “from txt” designation at the bottom of this tweet that tells readers Evan is mid-spit as he recounts his present activity.

When it's a CEO who's twittering, you never know who's going to pop into the narrative.

Tweets can usually stand alone, but are often funnier and more telling when read in the context of other tweets. A good Twitterer knows how to strike a balance.

Tweets aren't meant to be saved for life's precious moments; instead, they exist specifically for the pedestrian details of users' lives. That's because to other users, those pedestrian details can be oddly engaging and vivid.

Tweets can expand to involve whole groups of people – like an entire Whole Foods Market -- or be as intimate as a solitary person checking his e-mail. What was in that e-mail, anyway?

Unlike blog posts, tweets don't feel like they need gravity to be interesting. Sometimes an errant thought is enough to satisfy the masses.

What’s Evan Williams Doing Right Now?

Twitter is a little bit soap-box and a little bit stand-up. It does odd things to the conventions of conversation; brevity becomes sincerity, solipsism becomes introspection, and almost everything becomes fascinating. Individual “tweets” are frequently funny and rarely as mundane as you'd think, and when you read them in succession, they coalesce into a disarmingly honest narrative that can provide more insight into an individual's life than an entire year of blogging could. No one is a more exemplary user than Twitter's co-founder himself, Evan Williams. Read his tweets and step inside the often-silly life of a Silicon Valley CEO.

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