Fast Company

New Advice from Jack

So the buzz is beginning to build for Jack Welch's new book, which makes its debut in early April. This time, Jack teamed up with his wife, Suzy, for a book called Winning. Amazon.com recently published a letter from Jack with some early tips from Winning, including these dos and don'ts on managing your career:

Jack Welch on Getting Ahead

Do:

  • Over-deliver your results and expand the horizon of your responsibility.
  • Manage your subordinates with the same carefulness that you manage your boss.
  • Get on the radar screen by getting behind major initiatives early.
  • Relish the input of lots of mentors, realizing that mentors dont always look like mentors.
  • Have a positive attitude and spread it around.

Don't:

  • Make your boss use political capital to champion you.
  • Let setbacks break your stride.

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6 Comments

  • Ryan Jennings

    When I read a book like this a lot of what I read won't stick with me, but one sentence or a list like this will. I believe it's those little "nuggets" that you get out of a book that make it worth reading in the first place. As a college student I believe we don't hear enough of this and that might be the sole purpose for copying, pasting and printing it out, so I can be reminded to think about these keys on my way to my internship.

    Just an educated comment from an almost educated person.

  • Lisa

    Over deliver? Get on the radar screen? Mentors? Political capital? Gee, where have we heard those before? Next thing you know he'll be writing about a paradigm shift and thinking outside of the box. Yadda yadda yadda.

  • Jim Pepitone

    This kind of formulaic drivel, even from someone as successful as Jack Welch was, is moreoften misguiding than helpful to hardworking people trying to make a success of their lives. The systemic context of everyone's work requires deeper personal knowledge, thought and conviction than will result from the unchallenged acceptance of Jack and Suzy's "Platitutes."

    Sure, with this book deal Jack and Suzy have the opportunity to make a few million more off of Jack's remarkable prior success with GE. But people earnestly looking for career guidance should not confuse this book-selling opportunity with effective support for career success. They would be better served to spend their $20 on a book about system dynamics, applied psychology, or some other empirically based knowledge with broad and deep relevance to personal effectiveness in the 21st Century.

  • Tom Asacker

    I have to agree with Jeffrey, and I worked for Welch at GE during his early days as CEO. Why doesn't Jack just cut the crap and tell it like it is/was? He got the nickname "Neutron Jack" because he wasn't afraid to make hard, unpopular decisions. Back then, it was about taking out people without destroying the buildings.

    Give us the real Jack, Jack. We can handle the truth! We could give a jack about the politically correct Jack. Or are you simply trying to sell books?

  • Jim Pepitone

    Yawn! This kind of formulaic drivel, even from someone as successful as Jack Welch was, is moreoften misguiding than helpful to hardworking people trying to make a success of their lives. The systemic context of everyone's work requires deeper personal knowledge, thought and conviction than will result from the unchallenged acceptance of Jack and Suzy's "Platitutes."

    Sure, with this book deal Jack and Suzy have the opportunity to make a few million more off of Jack's remarkable prior success with GE. But people earnestly looking for career guidance should not confuse this book-selling opportunity with effective support for career success. They would be better served to spend their $20 on a book about system dynamics, applied psychology, or some other empirically based knowledge with broad and deep relevance to personal effectiveness in the 21st Century.

  • Jeffrey Cufaude

    Wow. What brilliance. What insight. What rehashed ideas that have been around for years and now will be done yet again by yet another white male exec. Just what the world needs.