Love Letter Perfect CRM

In response to a recent article on improvements in customer service, Fast Company reader brought to my attention an article she wrote earlier this year. C+RM, What's the Plus? contends that business leaders shouldn't necessarily focus on traditional CRM in terms of managing customer relationships — but that they should concentrate on C+RM, Cherish and Respect Management.

Do you cherish select customers? Respect all of the people you work with? How might the way we work change if we don't just respect our colleagues and partners — but cherish them? Relish them?

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3 Comments

  • gautam g

    I've been reading this book "Customer Culture"
    There's a dental clinic in Australia (Paddi Lund's clinic), where they take you as a customer only if you have references from an existing customer and if you're a nice sort. They liberally "fire" unpleasant or irritable customers (mainly by referring such customers to other dentists). At the same time, they set high, inviolable standards for their staff
    The result - mutual respect and cherished relationships..

    However, turning down customers is too counter-intuitive for most commercial organisations - its all about priorities - are your's lasting relationships OR the near-term bottomline?

  • aleah sato

    I agree with Kelleen, a more pragmatic view would be to try to maintain a positive dialogue with difficult customers or employees. To equip staff with a framework and example of how to maintain a healthy emotional distance while showing appreciation for the service the other party provides (i.e. loyalty, sales, their time, etc.).

    Appreciation is essential, but cherish may be a bit of stretch.

  • Kelleen

    It would be beautiful and we'd all be productive, happy, satisfied, motivated people. I think that sounds great on paper.

    But in my mind, the first obstacle to overcome is: How to work with people that we can barely stand to be in the same room with? Can you truly cherish EVERYONE or is it their patronage you cherish? I'd be happy sometimes with peaceful coexistence.