FC Recommends

What is -- and isn't -- on the Fast Company bookshelf.

Big Picture

The Future in Plain Sight: Nine Clues to the Coming Instability,
by Eugene Linden
(Simon & Schuster, 1998).

Linden, a veteran journalist, pieces together a vivid picture of the future, circa 2050. It's not a pretty sight, marked as it is by ecological catastrophe, vast human suffering, and cultural sanitization. Linden also offers a vigorous examination of the interplay of changing economic, environmental, and demographic patterns.

Best Practice

Career Intelligence: The 12 New Rules for Work and Life Success,
by Barbara Moses
(Berrett-Koehler, 1997).

Moses, a Canadian career guru, hits every sinister note in the new world of work - including the end of the "job." But just as you're about to hurl yourself over the cubicle wall, she offers a truly useful guide to career activism. She starts readers off with four Zen-like principles: "Be a career activist," "Know yourself," "Know what you love," "Be who you are."

Sleeper

Day Job: A Workplace Reader for the Restless Age,
by Jonathan Baird
(Allen & Osborne, 1998).

This quirky workplace journal, complete with clippings from management theory and shrewd marginal jottings, offers a canny, cubicle-eye view of the new freedoms and the age-old oppressions of work. The look is handcrafted hypertext; the voice is more working-class hero than Gen-X malcontent.

Keeper

The 48 Laws of Power,
by Robert Greene and Joost Elffers
(Viking, 1998).

This dizzying encyclopedia of duplicitous cunning draws on the wisdom of masters of the "art of indirection" - from the writers of ancient Chinese proverbs to Machiavelli - to provide an inexhaustible supply of strategies for getting ahead. One favorite: "Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit."

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