The Company With The Best Culture? Twitter, According To Glassdoor

Tech companies made a strong showing in Glassdoor's first report ranking corporate cultures.

To outsiders, Silicon Valley work culture seems almost like a joke: college kids pretending to be adults in unkempt hair who show up to business meetings wearing wrinkled T-shirts with jeans. But for the people entrenched in it, what could be better?

Glassdoor on Friday released its first report on the companies with the best work culture and values, as determined by reviews and ratings by former and current employees. Not only does Twitter top the list, but tech made a strong showing overall, filling 11 of the 25 spots. Aside from the microblogging service, the list also includes Google at No. 3, Facebook at No. 5, and Apple at No. 15.

What is it that Twitter employees love about their workplace? Friendly coworkers, for one ("Great culture—people are very smart and willing to help. Everyone is friendly," wrote one account executive) and rooftop meetings for another ("Team meetings on the roof are the best, great teamwork and a lot of smart people," a software engineer reported).

Interestingly, fast-food chain Chick-fil-A (the only one representing its industry) was ranked at No. 7. Employees appreciated the flexible schedule and family-oriented culture at the company, which in 2012 created a firestorm over its CEO's anti-gay-marriage remarks. “Great foundation in Christian values, flexible scheduling, great customer base, low turnover,” wrote a Chick-fil-A director.

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[Twitter Image: 360b via Shutterstock]

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3 Comments

  • Michael Todd Rognlien

    I really wish people would stop conflating dress code and culture. Did anyone in any of these Glassdoor surveys say that wearing wrinkled tshirts and jeans was something they valued about their place of employment?

    Culture, at its core, is the way people and organizations get work done. It is often confused with things like the aforementioned dress code, perks/benefits/etc, but those are at best reflections of a company's culture and what their people value, not the things that define their way of operating. The best cultures are ones that accommodate and facilitate the way that the majority of people like to get things done together, which is why it's possible for totally separate/distinct industries to all have strong cultures even though they may not be even remotely similar. The best companies understand what makes their employees tick, ritualize and celebrate those things that produce the best impact, and hire people who also value them.

  • THANK YOU! I feel like I'm always saying "Perks are not culture. Your office ping pong table is not your culture. How are you getting work done? How are you facilitating excellence? That's your culture." I understand why people get them confused, but tons of companies are getting ping pong tables and still failing. Let's stop perpetuating the myth that being fun and casual will make your company run.