Facebook recently started peppering some users' feeds with posts accompanied by a survey question that asks "How much do you agree with this statement?: This post feels like an ad."

A prompt asks the viewer to rate a post on its ad vibe, using a five-point scale from "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree."

The survey we took included posts that were obviously ads and others that were clearly regular statuses.

The purpose of the survey isn't explicit, but we imagine Facebook is looking to integrate sponsored content that feels more social and less commercial, so that users take a longer look.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Does Facebook's survey make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

Here's How Facebook Tests Sponsored Posts

Can you tell the difference between a status and an ad? Facebook is surveying users' feeds to find out.

Facebook took some heat over the weekend when New Scientist revealed that the company had secretly manipulated the feeds of more than 600,000 users for a psychological study about how positive or negative posts affected users' own emotions. But some of the social network's content-testing techniques are almost comically out in the open.

Facebook has been peppering some users' feeds with posts accompanied by a survey question: "How much do you agree with this statement? This post feels like an ad." A prompt asks the viewer to rate a post on its ad vibe, using a five-point scale from "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree." As the slideshow above demonstrates, the survey includes posts that are obviously ads and others that are clearly regular status updates; only a couple were ambiguous.

The purpose of the survey isn't explicit, but we imagine Facebook is looking to integrate sponsored content that feels more social and less commercial, so that users take a longer look. Either that, or they just came up with a novel way to get you to view a few more ads.

Does this make you uncomfortable? Agree or disagree in the comments.

[Image: Flickr user FACEBOOK(LET)]

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2 Comments

  • As a user, I wasn't uncomfortable because I chose to take the survey. As a small business marketer, if this helps increase ROI on news feed ads, this will help Facebook sell more ads. Unfortunately, as Facebook turns into a paid channel with currently low ROI, it's hard to justify spending more to get on the News Feed. As it stands right now, I think there's going to be a resurgence of email marketing and it's going to be better than ever: http://www.hatchbuck.com/blog/three-tips-email-marketing-creates-customers/

  • kimble.kate

    It didn't make me uncomfortable. Realistically, Facebook is an ad-supported entity. If they can tailor sponsored content to user preferences, that will just make my experience more enjoyable. If I want a non-commercialized experience, I go hiking. If I want free services that connect me to the world, I have to accept that they've got to make money somehow.