Feedly Refuses To Pay Ransom To Hackers Holding Its Service Hostage

A DDoS attack took down the RSS reader most of Wednesday morning. The service is still not back up.

Are you a Feedly fan missing the news today? You're not alone. Hackers have hit RSS reader Feedly with distributed-denial-of-service attacks. The company said Wednesday it refuses to pay the ransom the attackers are demanding.

"We refused to give in and are working with our network providers to mitigate the attack as best as we can," the company said in a blog post. Feedly, which is working with law enforcement, said it aims to bring its services back online with changes to its infrastructure. No user data has been lost or compromised, it added.

A spate of attacks in the last few days have affected a handful of companies. Note-taking app Evernote was inaccessible for much of Tuesday, but its service is now back up. TweetDeck briefly took down its services Wednesday afternoon after suffering from a security issue. (Though hacker group Anonymous claims to be responsible, it appears a 19-year-old from Australia triggered TweetDeck's bug.) On Saturday, French music streaming site Deezer was down for several hours, also because of a denial-of-service attack.

Cyber-ransoms have become a popular tactic of hackers, but many companies have taken a hard line stance against them, noting payment would make them vulnerable to future attacks. In March, denial-of-service attacks took down social networking site Meetup and project management tool Basecamp, but both companies refused to give in--even when the ransom was a mere $300.

[Image: Flickr user Davide Restivo]

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7 Comments

  • This is how a company with a serious image such as Feedly is supposed to react. When you are under attack, this means there is an ongoing crisis someone needs to take care of. As for the core of the crisis, the technical solution will surely come from internet security specialists.

    The other side of the coin is the company's reputation. Apparently Feedly don't take their image for granted. It was a great move to explain what the core of the problem was and inform their users about the subsequent actions which are about to happen in order to minimize the damages and get out of the crisis.

  • This is how a company with a serious image such as Feedly is supposed to react. When you are under attack, this means there is an ongoing crisis someone needs to take care of. As for the core of the crisis, the technical solution will surely come from internet security specialists.

    The other side of the coin is the company's reputation. Apparently Feedly don't take their image for granted. It was a great move to explain what the core of the problem was and inform their users about the subsequent actions which are about to happen in order to minimize the damages and get out of the crisis.

  • Geoff Rice

    One would think the NSA could help out in these situations since they monitor all traffic.