A Year After Snowden's Whistle Blew, Google, Reddit Among Those Vowing To "Reset The Net"

With the support of the American Civil Liberties Union, Google, Reddit, and other organizations, Reset the Net asks developers to add security features, such as HTTPS and SSL protections, to deter spying.

It's been a year since news of the National Security Agency's heavy-handed monitoring efforts were exposed by whistleblower Edward Snowden. In that time, the world has had a long, hard discussion on the importance of privacy. To commemorate the anniversary, an assembly of tech companies and civil rights organizations have banded together to promote a privacy campaign called Reset the Net.

With the support of the American Civil Liberties Union, Google, Reddit, and other organizations, Reset the Net is asking developers to add security features, such as HTTPS and SSL protections, to deter spying. On the other side of the equation, the campaign is also encouraging Internet users to try such privacy tools when browsing the web.

In addition, Reset the Net is offering a downloadable pack of privacy tools, such as Tor and mobile app ChatSecure to communicate privately. The Guardian, which broke the news of the NSA's spying programs with the Washington Post a year ago, also released a tool called SecureDrop for whistleblowers to submit documents securely to the newspaper.

"Today, our most intimate private records are being indiscriminately seized in secret, without regard for whether we are actually suspected of wrongdoing," Snowden wrote in an open letter published Thursday. "When these capabilities fall into the wrong hands, they can destroy the very freedoms that technology should be nurturing, not extinguishing. Surveillance, without regard to the rule of law or our basic human dignity, creates societies that fear free expression and dissent, the very values that make America strong."

In the past year, the government has been working on NSA reforms. Obama announced earlier this year he wanted to amend a section of the Patriot Act that allows for metadata tracking in phone records. Last month, the House of Representatives passed a bill—albeit a watered-down version—to overhaul the agency's collection of phone records.

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  • Alan MacDonald

    Wow, I thought this news would be all over the progressive alt media net:

    "June 5, 2014 [Headline]: Court Again Orders Government Not to Destroy Evidence in NSA Spying Case

    Judge Requires Explanation by Friday About Whether Government Is Still Destroying Evidence Despite Court Order

    San Francisco - The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) asked a judge today to schedule an emergency hearing, after learning that the government is apparently still destroying evidence of NSA spying despite a temporary restraining order (TRO) issued by the court in March. In an order issued in response this afternoon, U.S. District Judge Jeffrey S. White instructed the government not to destroy any more materials and file a brief responding to EFF's allegations by 12 p.m PT on Friday."

    source: rt.com/usa/164060-surveillance-destroy-data-judge/

    Oh, that's right ---- the so-called Progressive alt-net media, like the MSM, doesn't seem to provide any news to the people that might be up-setting to the f*ck