Meet The Disarmingly Adorable Robot That Will One Day Chase Us Down For Our Machine Overlords

This is the OutRunner, a tiny little Kickstarter bot with some serious sprinting power. It's cool, but...

Some think the robot apocalypse might be an overblown fabrication dreamed up by sci-fi dorks. But if machines like DARPA's clumsy and ambling Atlas bot really do become sentient killing machines, at the very least we'd be able to outrun them, right?

Wrong.

Over here we have a little guy called OutRunner, which has legs specifically built to mimic those of fleshy humans but can maintain speeds of 20 miles an hour outdoors. Don't let its pint size or the fact that it spins like the Road Runner's blurry feet fool you. It can run pretty much anywhere: On roads. Off-road. It doesn't matter. Unless you happen to be named Usain Bolt, the OutRunner—which the creators say broke the world speed record for legged robots—will catch up to you when your feeble human anatomy breaks down.

One glimmer of hope: The remote-control operated OutRunner is still in its Kickstarter phase, and just $20,000 have been pledged of its $150,000 goal. Fund it if you'd like, but know this: You are making things that much easier for our one-day machine overlords to capture us and store our bodies in biology-sucking battery pods. Swear your allegiances now.

[h/t: Core77]

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15 Comments

  • Matt Austin Smith

    If there was any benefit over a wheel on rough terrain, I think they would of shown footage of that. Looks like they are driving 1 step forward, taking the wheels off and walking 2 steps back....

  • Their Kickstarter page states that it can run for 2 hours on the same juice that would power an RC car for 20 mins. So scale this bad boy up and put me in one. Here's the next phase in automobiles. Read the kickstarter page for slightly more info on their concepts of kinetic and potential energy.

  • connork99

    The benefit over the wheel is for rough terrain. It's really difficult for a wheeled robot to traverse uneven or rocky ground, but with these leg-like structures it's much simpler.

  • Matt Austin Smith

    Then why don't they show and test it on uneven surfaces? Probably because it can't.

  • Mychat Posts

    last thing: I hope they're not counting on Frenchie to be their main pitch man. I can't understand a word he's saying

  • Mychat Posts

    we don't call motorcycles or radio control cars robots. These guys are seriously peddling this as a robot?

  • Mychat Posts

    I'm thinking if you put a circular thing, like an 'o' that would connect all the legs, somehow... just spitballing here... like um... a circle thingie... with a rubber surface... maybe pneumatic... but I'm thinking circle a round thing..... call it, a - I dunno- wee, whee... something whee... a wheex? a whee-dul? oh maybe a WHEEL?

  • Lori Croy

    I don't think it is cute at all. It's really kind of creepy in a mechanical spider way. Even the noise it makes reminds me of scuttling insects.

  • Peter de Man

    no offence here, i think its extremely cool. But, if the legs are like the spokes of wheels and rotate like wheels then what is the benefit over wheels?

  • Shawn Starr

    what if the wind knocks it over, or it hits a pothole, rock, bump. etc. Can it pick itself back up and start running again?

  • Roland Lindner

    You don;t need much wind. What happens if it simply stops? Does it always need a launch pad like in the video?