Watch A Murderer Use Snapchat To Commit The Perfect Crime In This 6-Minute Film

In Murder On Snapchat, the message-deleting app, along with other social media, becomes the platform of your worst nightmares.

It's normal to be anxious about the digital permanence of your activity on social media, but according to this film, we might have a lot more to fear from Snapchat messages that disappear forever.

In James Corbett's six-minute Murder On Snapchat, the app that deletes your messages seconds after they're sent is used to commit the perfect crime. It's creepy and dark, and feels like it could totally happen.

And like this film from last year set entirely on a teen's computer screen, the plot is told entirely through social media—all the dialog, and the final twist, happen the protagonist's Facebook, texting, and Snapchat screens. Happy messaging!

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9 Comments

  • María Cava Cava

    I love take photos, because of it I love <a href="http://www.snapchat.com.es/">snapchat</a>. I would like download snapchat in my android phone.

  • Lauren Lane Allison

    How in the world is the murderer using Snapchat "to commit the perfect crime"? Did you not watch the film, or do you not understand the concept of a perfect crime?

    It's a short about two girlfriends of the same guy who find out about each other. And includes Snapchat. I might have enjoyed it if you hadn't teed it up so horribly.

  • Gary Marriott

    No murder committed, the knife handed to the GF had a rounded unsharpened end. Any attempt to use it as shown would only end up wrenching it out of the perp's hand and probably sever their index finger in the process.

    So BF is bruised but otherwise uninjured and gets next hit fro free.

  • Dorothee Hasnas

    WTF is wrong with people?! this is way beyond. why does sex always get censored - and never violence? gives me nightmares. not ok.

  • Trent L. Leavitt

    Do you have any idea how easy it would be to solve that crime? Really really easy. Murder yes, but come on. The amount of evidence left behind was almost too much...