7 Habits of Highly Emotionally Intelligent People

People with high emotional intelligence tend to do better at work. So what habits do they have that set them apart?

It has increasingly become accepted that emotional intelligence is an important factor in our success and happiness, not only at work, but in our relationships and all areas of our lives.

So what sets emotionally intelligent people apart? Here are seven habits that people with high EI have:

1. They Focus on the Positive

While not ignoring the bad news, emotionally intelligent people have made a conscious decision to not spend a lot of time and energy focusing on problems. Rather, they look at what is positive in a situation and look for solutions to a problem. These people focus on what they are able to do and that which is within their control.

2. They surround themselves with positive people

People with a lot of emotional intelligence don’t spend a lot of time listening to complainers and tend to avoid negative people. They are aware negative people are an energy drain and are not willing to let others exhaust their vitality. Because they always look for solutions and the positive in situations, negative people quickly learn to avoid positive people as misery loves company.

Emotionally intelligent people spend time with others that are positive and look upon the bright side of life. You can spot these folks as they tend to smile and laugh a great deal and attract other positive people. Their warmth, openness, and caring attitude leads others look upon them as more trustworthy.

3. They are able to set boundaries and be assertive when necessary

Although their friendly, open nature may make them appear as pushovers to some, people with high EI are able to set boundaries and assert themselves when needed. They demonstrate politeness and consideration but stay firm at the same time.

They do not make needless enemies. Their response to situations, in which there may be conflict, is measured, not inflated, and managed appropriately to the situation. They think before speaking and give themselves time to calm down if their emotions appear to become overwhelming. High EI people guard their time and commitments and know when they need to say no.

4. They are forward thinking and willing to let go of the past

People with high EI are too busy thinking of possibilities in the future to spend a lot of time dwelling upon things that didn’t work out in the past. They take the learning from their past failures and apply it to their actions in the future. They never see failure as permanent or a personal reflection of themselves.

5. They look for ways to make life more fun, happy, and interesting

Whether it is in their workplace, at home, or with friends, high EI people know what makes them happy and look for opportunities to expand the enjoyment. They receive pleasure and satisfaction from seeing others happy and fulfilled, and do whatever they can to brighten someone else’s day.

6. They choose how they expend their energy wisely

While these enlightened people are good at moving on from the past when things didn’t work out as expected, they are also able to move on from conflicts involved with others. High EI folks don’t hold on to anger over how others have treated them, rather use the incident to create awareness of how to not let it happen again. “Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me,” is their motto. While they move on and forgive, they don’t forget and are unlikely to be taken advantage of again in the same set of circumstances.

7. Continually learning and growing towards independence

Highly emotionally intelligent people are lifelong learners, constantly growing, evolving, open to new ideas, and always willing to learn from others. Being critical thinkers, they are open to changing their minds if someone presents an idea that is a better fit. While they are open to ideas from others, and continuously gathering new information, they ultimately trust themselves and their own judgment to make the best decision for themselves.

[Image: Flickr user André Solnik]

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27 Comments

  • As with many intelligence gauges, there will always be arguments for and against them. We tend to be more apt to see articles like Mr. Deutschendorf's in black and white, instead of seeing it as another piece to the human intellect puzzle. I don't imagine he's trying to say this is the end-all, be-all of emotional intelligence, but perhaps an offering of qualities that folks with greater emotional adaptability exhibit.

    This is a great article that can merely be added to our breadth of knowledge of ourselves and those around us or discarded if it doesn't fit our particular view point of intelligence.

  • Mac Carter

    E.I. is based on solid research. That is partly why it has gained credibility. What is the basis for this claim that these are 7 common habits of people with high E.I. traits?

  • As a person with a fair amount of EI, I have a bias, but it appears "EI" is a better gauge of resilience and empathy than happiness, especially when considering not being ruled by past circumstances and outcomes. Something to bear in mind on this Patriot's Day, when resilience is on public display in Boston. I would mind seeing a rating factor for resilience; I have a couple of algorithm functions in mind that would really benefit.

  • Zoe Ronen

    All of these are related somehow to positiveness and "looking at the bright side." I don't see why this is a better method to measure intelligence than IQ. So before we measured people by their ability to solve problems, now we measure them by the degree of happiness they express? There are also many disadvantages to being a positive person.

  • Cathy Formusa Lmt

    6 out of the 7, not bad right? Oh pleeeeze..we are going to rate our EI? IMHO, we would all be much better off creating rather than labeling EI.. by labeling it we have made it a sect to become rather than assume and accept all as developing into a more EI reality, which would be much more efficient for all of us...and more loving..and in motion

  • Emory Strother

    Completely agree with the tinge of irony in these kinds of articles regarding EI. While I think it's wholly positive that EI is gaining social acceptance, it's hard not to see a mixed message in lists such as this one. EI's personal and social impact is largely derived from authenticity. These lists are about "type-anointing". While I love this topic getting attention (and the article is attention grabbing), I think EI's very nature begs a bit of self-awareness about how we present it.

  • EI should not be associated with being a "positive-look on the bright side" sort of person. This article is assuming that all emotionally intelligent people are emotionally sensitive. I don't think EI is what the author is defining; instead, Ithink he/she is defining optimistic people and their habits. I define emotional intelligence as being able to read peoples emotions and having the capacity to act accordingly. You can be emotionally intelligent and use that knowledge(some would say skill) to manipulate others to get what is in your best interest- that's not being a positive-surround myself with like-minded people...If you are "highly" EI and you come across someone who is negative and wants to vent, because of the way the sound, act, look, and so forth, you will act accordingly to whether you are a selfless or selfish person. Furthermore, if there is no personal investment, the "highly" EI can decide not to act at all because they are apathetic to the person/situation. Thoughts?

  • Karen Schultz

    This is exactly how I spend my day.... being emotionally intelligent is not always easy and being true to yourself in this manner is difficult for others to fully grasp.
    Being emotionally intelligent sometimes gives you more information than you want and learning how to manage it is a skill set to practice. Thank you for the summary.

  • Good summation of EI habits. As I read through the seven habits, I could relate them to myself and my behaviors. It is a challenge though to continuously maintain and improve on these habits. Situational leadership requires good EI.

  • A great summary and description of what EI looks like when we see it in others (or ourselves). The challenge is not only to "get" what it is but to develop one's own EI. While some of these are conscious decisions--"I will seek out positive people," others are more deeply rooted, like letting go of the past. Much harder to do in an enduring way.

  • Kim Hansen

    Definitely a lot of great advices and great human characteristics to strive towards. Also hard to remember every day and in every situation.

    To actually be like this every day is not easy as we are very much in a reactive mode throughout our busy days.

    How can we actually be like this in an easy way?

    I tell myself to be positive action. Whenever I have a new situation I ask myself, what is the most positive action I can take in this situation.

  • What do you mean by reactive mode ?

    I guess as long as you are aware of EI, you understand its benefits and are willing to embrace it, you'll be able to easily put it into practice also you might have a completely different personality.

  • Zahi Kanaan

    he's wrong. their is used for possession, while they're is used before an adjective or description of what the group of people are going to do/are doing.