Mod aims to combine the best of both digital and analog. After users are done filling up a physical notebook, they can send it in for digitization.

Borrowing from Moleskine's beloved notepads, Mod features a flap at the back, which holds an envelope with a prepaid shipping label.

It takes about five days after sending before users can access their notes on Mod's web app, which can also be synced to external services, such as Dropbox and Evernote.

Including shipping and digitizing, Mod notebooks, which have roughly the same dimensions of an iPad Mini, cost $25.

Those who want their notebooks back after the digitizing process can pay an extra $10, which the cofounders say covers the additional shipping and time required to scan the pages.

Notebook view of the web app.

An overview of the pages in a notebook.

The page view on Mod's app.

Notebook view on a smartphone.

Sync settings on a smartphone.

View of a page on a smartphone.

Have A Digital Life, But Love Writing By Hand? This Notebook Is For You

At the intersection of analog and digital, the Mod notebook lets you send your handwritten notes and doodles off to be digitized.

Even in the age of mobile devices, it's hard to beat pen and paper.

Sure, there are apps like FiftyThree's Paper that allow people to doodle to their hearts' content. But Marshall Haas and Jon Wheatley wanted to combine the best of both analog and digital, which is why they created Mod, a paper notebook accessible to the cloud, launched Monday.

"As far as an input device, pen and paper is something you can't really beat in my opinion," Wheatley told Fast Company. "When it comes to storing handwritten notes, having them in a digital format is very valuable."

Borrowing from Moleskine's beloved notepads, Mod notebooks feature a flap at the back, which holds an envelope with a prepaid shipping label. After filling up the notebook's pages, users can send them to a facility to be digitized. About five days later, the notes can then be accessed on Mod's web app and can also be synced to external services, such as Dropbox and Evernote.

Including shipping and digitizing, Mod's notebooks, which have roughly the same dimensions of an iPad Mini, cost $25. Those who want their notebooks back after the pages are scanned can pay an extra $10, which Wheatley said covers the additional shipping and time required to manually digitize the pages. This is largely because the typical digitizing process requires cutting the notebook's spine to efficiently scan its pages, but it becomes more of a manual process to preserve the notebook. Though Wheatley said Mod will only digitize its own notebooks at launch, it will consider accepting other types of notebooks in the future.

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8 Comments

  • Mena Aboud

    I actually don't see the point, i can digitalise myself, why risk sharing my notes with strangers. I think the idea for a company to do that isn't that great, but still he will maybe find people to use his service . It would been better if his created a tool to fit that paper note, and apply the method in a unique and easy way.

  • Whitelines Link..! Notepads but now also together with Leuchtturm1917 fine notebooks. Download free paper to try out on whitelines.se/printpapers . The app is free.

  • Nice concept, but not quite sure why you wouldn't just take a picture? I use Inkflow for my sketches and it even lets me pull in drawings as vectors.

    Also, I don't think I'd be comfortable mailing in my precious notebooks.

  • Vonvo Testa

    Just use an Evernote notebook. You can sync your picture of your notes instantly, no need for snail mail.

  • So it's like a slower version of the Evernote Moleskine notebook? I guess it's nice that someone else does the scanning for you but the reason why I'd ever want my notes digitized is so that I can search them immediately.

    Also, the example notebook where someone sends in their "Diary" and "Secrets" notebooks in for someone else to leaf through and scan is a little disconcerting.