Glenn Greenwald Unveils His New Journalism Venture: The Intercept

Its mission is "to provide a platform and an editorial structure in which to aggressively report on the disclosures provided to us by our source, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden."

Three months after leaving the Guardian, investigative reporter Glenn Greenwald has launched his new journalism venture. It is called The Intercept, and its initial focus zeroes in on the NSA surveillance program, a story that Greenwald broke.

"The Intercept has a two-fold mission: one short-term, the other long-term," he writes in an introductory post. "Our short-term mission is… to provide a platform and an editorial structure in which to aggressively report on the disclosures provided to us by our source, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden." Its second, more long-term mission is to provide "aggressive and independent adversarial journalism across a wide range of issues, from secrecy, criminal and civil justice abuses and civil liberties violations."

Alongside Greenwald at launch are top editors Jeremy Scahill, formerly of The Nation, and documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras. The Intercept is a product of First Look Media, which is helmed by Pierre Omidyar, the multibillionaire who founded eBay. The Intercept appears to be off to quite a start, too. One of its first stories charges into the NSA's role in the U.S. assassination program.

In early January, Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher, the tech writers behind the Wall Street Journal's AllThingsD blog, departed the newspaper to launch their own site, Re/code. And just yesterday, The New York Times's Bill Keller announced he was leaving the paper to join The Marshall Project, a journalism startup, as its editor-in-chief.

[Image: The Intercept]

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