Rap Genius launched its first iPhone app, Genius, Tuesday, allowing fans to browse notations for song lyrics, news articles, poetry, history, and more.

Cofounder Tom Lehman says about half of site's traffic comes from mobile devices. "In 1,000 years, when the aliens land, ‘Rap Genius’ will literally mean ‘that dope iPhone app.’ This app has long been our users’ most-requested feature, and we’re pumped to finally deliver."

In addition to browsing annotations, Genius can also pull up lyrics for songs in users' iTunes libraries. The app can also surface lyrics and their annotations when it detects a song that's playing.

A mobile app will mean less emphasis on search, especially since Lehman foresees a time when 100% of Rap Genius's traffic will come from mobile.

Rap Genius's IPhone App Puts Annotations In Your Pocket

The company said about half of its traffic comes from mobile devices, and foresees a future in which all of its traffic is mobile.

Rap Genius is bringing its user-generated annotations of the web to the iPhone. The company launched its first iPhone app, Genius, Tuesday, allowing fans to browse notations for song lyrics, news articles, poetry, history, and more.

"This is the true launch of Rap Genius," cofounder Tom Lehman said in a statement, noting that about half of site's traffic comes from mobile devices. "In 1,000 years, when the aliens land, ‘Rap Genius’ will literally mean ‘that dope iPhone app.’ This app has long been our users’ most-requested feature, and we’re pumped to finally deliver."

In addition to browsing annotations, Genius can also pull up lyrics for songs in users' iTunes libraries. The app can also surface lyrics and their annotations when it detects a song that's playing.

A mobile app will mean less emphasis on search, especially since Lehman foresees a time when 100% of Rap Genius's traffic will come from mobile. The company was recently in trouble with Google for its SEO practices, which has since been resolved.

[Image: Flickr user ell brown]

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2 Comments

  • Md Emon

    Fast Company's done many young person involved in the development of an application which appears to solve a teen problem.Fast Company's West Coast correspondent. As a special contributor for USA TODAY, she wrote a tech column and hosted an online gadgets show. I hope that he will grow up being an application architect focused on serious business in the real world. http://www.templateeye.com/