THE 5 BEST AND WORST THINGS ABOUT WORKING FROM HOME

For those trapped in a cubicle or an open office working from home may sound like pajama-clad heaven. But there are two sides to every coin. Here are the trials and triumphs of the home office--in your own words. The first five slides represent the best aspects of working from home, while the final five represent the worst.

THE BEST: 1. FREEDOM

My rules. My way. My pace. My goals.
I cannot stress enough how important it is to me that I'm working for something I personally care about in a creative manner. When I create I get messy and my bosses usually were too psycho-rigid... @Alan_RY

THE BEST: 2. THE AMENITIES

Sitting on my patio on a warm summer's day with Wimbledon on my iPad in the background whilst I worked! @thewheelexists

THE BEST: 3. BEING CLOSE TO LOVED ONES

No question--being near my family. For eight years I worked more than an hour away from home, so there were many early mornings and late nights. Working from home, I am able to help around the house and experience life with my family--like watching my daughter take her first steps. @trent_scott

THE BEST: 4. WORK HOW YOU WANT, WHEN YOU WANT

I've worked in offices for about 40 years. I was recently hired in a great job working from home. It took me a while to not to worry about 'looking busy' during slow periods. No one is watching and judging! What freedom that is! @lmpratscher

THE BEST: 5. NO COMMUTE

My morning commute now consists of walking from the bedroom to the office, which has saved me gas money, and there’s no line for my morning cup of coffee. @salesbuddy

THE WORST: 1. THE STIGMA

Dealing with managers (and CEOs) who are set in the antiquated way of thinking that if they can't see you, you can't possibly be doing work. @jaynawallace

THE WORST: 2. NO BOUNDARIES

When I have relatives over while I'm working, it's hard for me to say: Sorry, I'm busy now... but they just take my presence and open door as an invitation to just talk to me openly without my consent. I'm an introvert, I hate when my thoughts are interrupted! @Alan_RY

THE WORST: 3. ISOLATION

There are moments of loneliness. That deck I'm working on, the copy I just wrote; while I can email it to a friend or co-worker there's no one in person to sit and review/collaborate/iterate with me on it. I can't exactly have my dog review it. The companionship that you get by going into an office and developing live relationships is something that I miss. @icyfrance

THE WORST: 4. THE DISTRACTION

Sticking to a schedule is the hardest because there a tons of distractions while at the same time not being "watched over" gives my lazy side more temptation. Inconsiderate friends and relatives and who assume you don't really work and call you out to help them move or pick them up from the airport. @Kapilbulsara

THE WORST: 5. STAGNATION

Sitting too much, which is very bad for my health. I know I need to get up and walk (run, dance) around more, but I get into what I'm doing on the computer and forget. @escapeartist02

The 5 Best And Worst Things About Working From Home

For those trapped in a cubicle or an open office, working from home may sound like pajama-clad heaven. But there are two sides to every coin. Here are the trials and triumphs of the home office—in your own words.

Is working from home a blessing, or a curse?

That's what we wanted to find out last week. So we put out a call on Facebook and Twitter asking for your input. Many of you, after all, have experienced both sides of the coin.

The results came streaming in and after just a few days we received over 100 detailed—and passionate—responses.

Below, we've singled out some of the most common positives, and negatives that you have found. We've also listed respondents' Twitter handles so you can continue the conversation!

The Good:

1. Freedom

My rules. My way. My pace. My goals.
I cannot stress enough how important it is to me that I'm working for something I personally care about in a creative manner. When I create I get messy and my bosses usually were too psycho-rigid... @Alan_RY

Freedom to use your time as you see best fit, and working only as much as you need to. @nagra__

2. The Amenities

Sitting on my patio on a warm summer's day with Wimbledon on my iPad in the background whilst I worked! @thewheelexists

3. Being close to loved ones

My grandparents and I live in the same apartment building. Being at home working gives me the chance to just drop by to share a meal together or even sometimes cook for them. I would not trade those precious moments for a job that pays me enough to buy a Porsche. @Alan_RY

No question—being near my family. For eight years I worked more than an hour away from home, so there were many early mornings and late nights. Working from home, I am able to help around the house and experience life with my family—like watching my daughter take her first steps. @trent_scott

4. Work how you want, when you want

The greatest benefit from working from home is the ability to work on any project at any time. You can start your day early or late and finish when you like. You have the flexibility to plan your day and include your errands and be there for others. @imediaexposure

I've worked in offices for about 40 years. I was recently hired in a great job working from home. It took me a while to not to worry about 'looking busy' during slow periods. No one is watching and judging! What freedom that is! @lmpratscher

5. No commute

No commute during Chicago winters, no office politics except when one of my dogs decides he no longer likes the other, being able to take a guilt-free break whenever I want and having complete control over my environment—noise, temp, decor/aesthetics, etc. @ResuMAYDAY

I save a lot of money on the days I work from home. Not having to spend money on buying lunch or a subway ticket or gas is a HUGE benefit. @jaiathomaslaw

My morning commute now consists of walking from the bedroom to the office, which has saved me gas money, and there’s no line for my morning cup of coffee. @salesbuddy

The Bad:

1. The stigma

Dealing with managers (and CEOs) who are set in the antiquated way of thinking that if they can't see you, you can't possibly be doing work. @jaynawallace

2. No Boundaries

When I have relatives over while I'm working, it's hard for me to say: Sorry, I'm busy now... but they just take my presence and open door as an invitation to just talk to me openly without my consent. I'm an introvert, I hate when my thoughts are interrupted! @Alan_RY

Sitting down at your computer as soon as you roll out of bed only to realize upon opening the door to the courier at 4 p.m. that you are still in your bathrobe and have not eaten lunch. And possibly not brushed your teeth. Not sure if that's the best or the worst thing about working from home: high on productivity but low on the social health scale.@aromacentric

Friends and family think that when you're working from home, you're available to help with other things. While this has gotten better over time for many people, I still get occasional lists of things that I don't have time for through the day.

3. Isolation

Loneliness and inability to work face-to-face with others to talk creatively, bounce ideas, etc. Distractions are plentiful, so it's always a challenge to avoid them.
@LouMongello

There are moments of loneliness. That deck I'm working on, the copy I just wrote; while I can email it to a friend or co-worker there's no one in person to sit and review/collaborate/iterate with me on it. I can't exactly have my dog review it. The companionship that you get by going into an office and developing live relationships is something that I miss.
@icyfrance

4. The distraction

The worst is definitely having friends and neighbors think that because I'm home, we can "hang out", get coffee, go run errands, or the flatmate who thinks that because I'm home, it's not an issue to expect, rather than ask, me to walk her dog twice a day, because I'm home anyway, when I actually have work to do or calls to make.
@michelejmartin

Sticking to a schedule is the hardest because there a tons of distractions while at the same time not being "watched over" gives my lazy side more temptation. Inconsiderate friends and relatives and who assume you don't really work and call you out to help them move or pick them up from the airport. @Kapilbulsara

Very little intellectual mind stimulating discussion with like minded work colleagues—really miss that! @Kapilbulsara

5. Stagnation

Sitting too much, which is very bad for my health. I know I need to get up and walk (run, dance) around more, but I get into what I'm doing on the computer and forget. @escapeartist02

Do you agree with these responses? If you've had a different experience, please share in the comments!

[Image: Flickr user Folkert Gorter]

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