AT&T and T-Mobile Slug It Out Over A Customer On Twitter

Starring: T-Mobile CEO John Legere in a cameo.

If you're going to slug it out over a customer, you might as well do it in public, where the rest of us can sit back with some popcorn and enjoy the show.

On Wednesday afternoon, that's just what T-Mobile and AT&T did. Spoiler: T-Mobile won. Here's how it went:

Jay Rooney, a disgruntled AT&T customer, tweeted:

A short while later, a T-Mobile customer service rep called Lisa responded with:



Enter (a really snarky) AT&T:



T-Mobile fires back with:



AT&T attempts to wave the white flag...



... when none other than T-Mobile CEO John Legere jumps into the fray:



And snatches away a customer right from under AT&T's nose:



You can read the full thread here.

[Image: Flickr user Filip Lachowski]

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13 Comments

  • Adam

    a few issues there. First of all, it is not SciAm that pointed out that "while the tradition of Western food is largely based upon these chemical overlaps, Eastern food is created quite differently, with dishes comprised of discrete flavors rather than interrelated ones", it was the work of Ahn et al. which the visualization is based on

  • John

    Hmm, a few issues there. First of all, it is not SciAm that pointed out that "while the tradition of Western food is largely based upon these chemical overlaps, Eastern food is created quite differently, with dishes comprised of discrete flavors rather than interrelated ones", it was the work of Ahn et al. which the visualization is based on. SciAm took the dataset and hired a designer to visualize the pairings, but Ahn and colleagues did the acutal analysis.

  • Adams

    Quite the graphic representation. Interesting to know how this food map plays into different cultural dishes.

  • Adams

    Hmm, a few issues there. First of all, it is not SciAm that pointed out that "while the tradition of Western food is largely based upon these chemical overlaps, Eastern food is created quite differently, with dishes comprised of discrete flavors rather than interrelated ones", it was the work of Ahn et al. which the visualization is based on. SciAm took the dataset and hired a designer to visualize the pairings, but Ahn and colleagues did the acutal analysis.
    So it's incorrect when, in the whole article, it is assumed that the hypothesis on flavor pairings is true, because the article shows that, well, it depends (it's true that these compounds are also the focus of SciAm's map). Knowing that, it may not come as surprising that beef and red wine do not share many chemical compounds, because chemical compounds may not have much to do with it :)
    In short, the food pairing hypothesis may sound cool and sexy, but scientists have shown that it's often wrong, so we have to be careful drawing conclusions.

  • John

    Quite the graphic representation. Interesting to know how this food map plays into different cultural dishes.

  • Adam

    Users love the photo-based social network so much that more than 1,000 of them have used Facebook to claim honorary titles at the 18-person company.

  • Adam

    Hmm, a few issues there. First of all, it is not SciAm that pointed out that "while the tradition of Western food is largely based upon these chemical overlaps, Eastern food is created quite differently, with dishes comprised of discrete flavors rather than interrelated ones", it was the work of Ahn et al. which the visualization is based on. SciAm took the dataset and hired a designer to visualize the pairings, but Ahn and colleagues did the acutal analysis.