Users Bash Instagram Advertisers In Comments

How long before Instagram bans comments on ads?

When Instagram announced that it would put ads in users' feeds, we knew there would be a backlash. And as reactions to some early ads show, the backlash is now well underway.

Instagram ads are just like regular posts--complete with likes and comments--and it turns out that users aren't shying away from giving brands a piece of their minds. Check out some choice outrage in the slideshow above.

So how long will it be, as Fast Company's John Brownlee tweets, till Instagram bans comments on ads? Or goes the YouTube route of attaching comments to real names?

[Image: Flickr user Psycholabs]

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14 Comments

  • excellence

    this is entertaining and frustrating to watch: companies and the advertisers who push their product try to figure out social media and the best ways to convert it to money...

    TL;DR:

    one issue is that companies make crap products that HAVE to break eventually so that the consumer will have to exchange more money (for the next model or replacement or 'add-ons' that should've came with the product in the first place) and repeat the cycle again next year.

    so one of the best ways to get people to buy your crap product is too shotgun blast ads for it wherever and as often as possible, some will hate it, some will click on it, but it gets it in everyone's minds...and now with all the data we the consumers are giving them, they don't have to 'shotgun' it anymore, they have machine guns. The ads are targeted and constant.

    The next step for advertisements, which will be the hardest, is to stop. it no longer needs to be push, it should turn into a pull based model. consumers will tell companies when and what they want and products will begin to be made from actual demand, down to a specific individual...

    if the NSA ever decides to do something beneficial, this is something that could easily be implemented. Knowing when somebody needs a product and what type of product they need. It could start off by assuming that anybody would want the 'best' model which could come from scanning product reviews, youtube demos, likes on facebooks, company stock prices, etc....related all that together over time and I bet you'll get a pretty good idea of what works and what people like. Tie that together with the other grey area stuff their doing (collecting our communications) and you can figure out WHEN a person needs something based off of what they're saying and who they're talking to... but this is getting to long now soo.....

  • Charles

    Second big issue is on the development side. Almost all the developers/ products I see are all oriented to and planning for monetization through ads. It's hard to ignore because you have all these brands trying to get in on digital, all these agencies trying to sell digital, and all these investors betting on the multi-billion dollar advertising pie shading over to digital. What's left out of the equation are consumers and end-user experiences. Just check out the whole freemium to premium model in full effect. You get huge traffic and captive audiences first on the premise of user experience and social utility, and then you either start playing games to nickel and dime them, or you sell out to advertisers. I'm telling you there's a growing resentment on this. just because it has worked in the past doesn't imply it will continue to do so- especially as the market of online experiences gets more volatile and saturated with alternatives.

  • Charles

    Instagram ads are just like regular posts--complete with likes and comments--and it turns out that users aren't shying away from giving brands a piece of their minds. Check out some choice outrage in the slideshow above.

  • Niko Lowry

    If the product/service is free; then you are the product, I wonder what these users' comments would be if they posted a filtered photo of their data getting sold to marketers and advertisers.

  • Charles

    Well I am glad it was at least expected, but this is indicative of a much broader issue. Actually a couple.

  • iam_Nunya

    I think it's brilliant to allow comments on these ads - can't think of a better way for advertisers to gage the audience appeal of their products.

    Some of the comments are really valuable, like the person who remarked about not being able to relate to the yuppies in expensive clothing in the Lexus ad.

    If I was Lexus I would take comments like that and try to create ads that are more appealing to the blue collar workers and tradespeople who are earning more now than ever. Talk about an opportunity to expand your product's popularity.

    Imagine an ad showing a NASCAR fan leaving the races and jumping into a Lexus - tagline says: "Lexus: Powerful Luxury."

  • Charles

    The adverts don't play the instagram game either. No filters, no mobile phone photos, these are all non-instagram specific, not using the platform in the same way as their intended audience. This is way the Jessie is so angry with Levis, shes being sold a dream shes knows is 1. not real & 2. not attainable (for her). She has probably been on a roadtrip (unlike the people who created and stared in this advert) so knows that its got little to do with the jeans you wear.

  • Charles

    If I was Lexus I would take comments like that and try to create ads that are more appealing to the blue collar workers and tradespeople who are earning more now than ever. Talk about an opportunity to expand your product's popularity.

  • madebyremedy

    The ads appear so much like photos from people you follow, it like people are being tricked to look at them. Advertising done well doesnt frustrate people, but that doesnt happen very often. The internet favours people who have a niche product for a niche group. This allows that business to solve a very specific problem as well knowing that group very very well.

    All the examples shown here are for brands that arent very interesting 'general electric', how much more dull do you want to get?

    The adverts don't play the instagram game either. No filters, no mobile phone photos, these are all non-instagram specific, not using the platform in the same way as their intended audience. This is way the Jessie is so angry with Levis, shes being sold a dream shes knows is 1. not real & 2. not attainable (for her). She has probably been on a roadtrip (unlike the people who created and stared in this advert) so knows that its got little to do with the jeans you wear.

    Advertising isnt the problem, its the advertisers not making the effort.

  • Charles

    All the examples shown here are for brands that arent very interesting 'general electric', how much more dull do you want to get?

  • Anthony Reardon

    Well I am glad it was at least expected, but this is indicative of a much broader issue. Actually a couple.

    I have been talking about this for years, but most people simply don't like ads lol! It's really simple. At best, people tolerate them. However, given the same kind of benefit on an alternative platform without ads, they are quite likely to get up and go there just for that fact. It's not that people just don't like them, but really despise them. It's a principle of designing human experience. Unlike the traditional forms of media like print, radio, and television, the new dynamic is an environment where people exercise choice about what is in front of them. Pushing something that negates their desired online experience is rather contradictory, is an obvious manipulation of their activity for someone else's profit, and condescending to their collective social authority. I don't know what is worse: that advertisers have no idea this is not a new medium where you can do the same thing you've always done on traditional media, or that advertisers know people hate ads but think it's still worth it to do anyway.

    Second big issue is on the development side. Almost all the developers/ products I see are all oriented to and planning for monetization through ads. It's hard to ignore because you have all these brands trying to get in on digital, all these agencies trying to sell digital, and all these investors betting on the multi-billion dollar advertising pie shading over to digital. What's left out of the equation are consumers and end-user experiences. Just check out the whole freemium to premium model in full effect. You get huge traffic and captive audiences first on the premise of user experience and social utility, and then you either start playing games to nickel and dime them, or you sell out to advertisers. I'm telling you there's a growing resentment on this. just because it has worked in the past doesn't imply it will continue to do so- especially as the market of online experiences gets more volatile and saturated with alternatives.

    Fundamentally you've got to establish your monetization from the onset. That's the only way you can avoid breaking the implicit agreement with fans of a given platform. You know what people want to hear and experience, so people buy into that when it is given, but when you change course later down the line when you have to "grow up, act like a real business, and bring in the capital to do so much more" that credibility gets tossed. It's just so obvious when you get these grand exits and big corporations acquiring popular platforms. Soon as that happens the consequences to end-users are predictable.

    There are more creative ways to get brand exposure that people can actually enjoy. For instance, tactful product and service placement within media, commercial free & substantive cause sponsoring, getting consumers and businesses using a platform side-by-side "with you" etc. This ridiculous trend is the only thing likely to continue happening, and that's great news for innovators and disruptors- lot's of opportunity to differentiate by getting it right. However, once people figure out how to get people to actually WANT to involve brands in their online experience, the window's going to close. Can't beat loyalty that's properly served.

    It's simple. Give people what they want. Don't give them what they don't want.

    Best, Anthony