Sign Language Ring is a device that detects sign language motion and "translates" that to voice by emitting audio through a speaker.

The design, inspired by Buddhist monks, won Sign Language Ring red dot's 2013 design concept award.

Users have the option to pre-record signing movements and assign words to them.

The wearable device can also translate voice to text, transcribing spoken language picked up by a microphone into text that's displayed on the bracelet's screen.

This Sign Language Ring Translates Hand Movements Into Spoken Words

The wearable device can also translate voice to text, transcribing spoken language picked up by a microphone into text that's displayed on the bracelet's screen.

A winner of the coveted red dot awards for design concept in 2013, Sign Language Ring is a device that detects sign language motion and "translates" that to voice by emitting audio through a speaker.

Comprising a bracelet and set of detachable rings worn on select fingers, Sign Language Ring was inspired by Buddhist prayer beads, according to its six designers from Asia University. The wearable device can also translate voice to text, transcribing spoken language picked up by a microphone into text that's displayed on the bracelet's screen.

Users have the option to pre-record signing movements and assign words to them, a feature that's especially handy since not all sign languages are the same. For example, British and American sign languages are vastly different even though both countries speak English. Furthermore, in the U.S., Black American sign language has distinct differences rooted in segregated education systems.

[Image: red dot/Asia University]

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23 Comments

  • Harold Antonio Molina

    Fail!!! Sign is not coded language. You can't capture the full meaning with this device... it will be just as bad if not worse than google translate.

  • Jimmy Moser

    yes fail because you have to set your own country languages first then it will succeed. i wonder why you say fail in the first place even though u have not set anything. pay attention !

  • Jeff

    Do you think it's better for someone who doesn't understand sign language to a) not have a clue what a signer is talking about or b) have a rudimentary understanding of what they are saying. This product seems to promise at least b, and that seems pretty good to me.

  • Harold Antonio Molina

    Well a good start would be asking the Deaf person who would be the person buying, programming, and using the device. In my experience, it's an effort from the non signer that leads to understanding. Hearing people can A) use natural gestures B) Write notes C) Study a Signed Language. Anyone of those options would provide a rudimentary understanding of what is being said. The burden to communicate lies with both people.

  • Jimmy Moser

    if one and only using ASL not like english written but ASL change it to sentence. sometime it can cause misunderstanding but thats Deaf culture. they all are using ASL its like abbreviate their sentence or jumping to make it short. like " i am going to the store and i will be right back" ASL is like "me store will back" ...

  • Beacuzz

    thank you. not to mention all of the nuances of a language compacted into a bracelet and a couple of rings. please. that can't be accurate.

  • Beacuzz

    That was one of my worries. Another, many signs are used for different words or concepts, the only way we know which is by context. Could it figure that out. Another issue, the height of the sign can change its meaning. So is it supposed to understand all that?

  • AdultEducator72

    I agree completely. What about nonmanual signs? What about classifiers? I don't see an application for this beyond using it for a hearing person to understand PSE, or maybe sign supported English in a classroom. Hand and finger movements are just a fraction of ASL. Right off the top of my head, I can think of a dozen better ways to assist communication between Deaf and hearing. Some of these iPhone and Android apps are excellent, some are so-so, and almost all of of them are free or pretty cheap.

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  • Michelle Hyrtle

    everybody has variations of English so whats wrong with different variations of sign language. everyones different man. take it from me, someone with TWO deaf sisters and who has been signing her entire life.... UNIQUENESS IS BEAUTY.