Why Everybody's Excited About Tile, The Easy Way To Make Sure You Never Lose Your Phone

Tile transforms its users into an anonymous, digital search party when things going missing.

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If Tile has its way, the era of lost keys—and stolen bikes or laptops—is over. Along with an accompanying app, Tile, a small and discreet device that can be attached to whatever you want to track, keeps a virtual eye on all the important physical things in your life. The app works by using bluetooth to track Tiles, which uses a "getting warmer" display in the app to direct users to the missing object. For when things get left behind or stolen, Tile tapped the cloud to create a network of users whose apps can ping you the location of your stuff if they happen to be nearby.

Nick Evans and Mike Farley

After a successful Selfstarter campaign—the largest ever—that brought in $2.6 million, Tile creators Nick Evans and Mike Farley have just moved into a new office in San Mateo and hired employees as they gear up for their debut, even as they still take more orders. They are set for an early 2014 delivery for their Selfstarter supporters, and are working their way through five prototypes and tweaks, trying to get Tile perfect.

"User experience is so important to this," Evans said. "People are expecting the world, and we want to deliver the world."

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Why Everybody's Excited About Tile, The Easy Way To Make Sure You Never Lose Your Phone

Tile transforms its users into an anonymous, digital search party when things going missing.

If Tile has its way, the era of lost keys—and stolen bikes or laptops—is over. Along with an accompanying app, Tile, a small and discreet device that can be attached to whatever you want to track, keeps a virtual eye on all the important physical things in your life. The app works by using bluetooth to track Tiles, which uses a "getting warmer" display in the app to direct users to the missing object. For when things get left behind or stolen, Tile tapped the cloud to create a network of users whose apps can ping you the location of your stuff if they happen to be nearby.

Nick Evans and Mike Farley

After a successful Selfstarter campaign—the largest ever—that brought in $2.6 million, Tile creators Nick Evans and Mike Farley have just moved into a new office in San Mateo and hired employees as they gear up for their debut, even as they still take more orders. They are set for an early 2014 delivery for their Selfstarter supporters, and are working their way through five prototypes and tweaks, trying to get Tile perfect.

"User experience is so important to this," Evans said. "People are expecting the world, and we want to deliver the world."