Google Street View Lets You Tour The Inside Of A Submarine

Ever wondered how cramped and confusing the inside of a submarine really is? Now you can find out, thanks to Google.

Google has added a remarkable new asset to its archive of decidedly-not-a-public-street locations visible in Street View: The retired Royal Navy submarine HMS Ocelot. This Oberon-class diesel electric sub was launched in 1962 and decommissioned in 1991 and now sits in dry dock in the South East of England.

Google's camera packs captured so much data inside that you can see the sub's weapons systems, maps on the command deck, as well as spot details like her periscope, the gauges on her two giant V16 diesel engines, and the six forward torpedo tubes.

There are miles of pipes and cabling, trip hazards, head-knock hazards, and not a lot of room to move about. Though you roam the decks alone in Street View, you can easily imagine how cramped the environment would be with her typical complement of 69 officers and crew.

Recently Google has taken Street View into the bowels of CERN's particle accelerator tunnels, to the top of Mount Fuji, and along the river Thames.

[Image: Google Maps]

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  • Neil Cooper

    Correction: this was shot by me via my company C Inside Media (http://cinsidemedia.com/google... and was part of the new Google Business Photos program not the Street View program.

    We are a Google Trusted Agency and business owners in numerous countries can sign up for such a tour.