Fast Company

Here Are Some E-book Features Consumers Say They'd Pay Money To Get

You can't really give an e-book away when you're done with it, but people would pay more for this option. Are you listening, Amazon?

A new report by the Book Industry Study Group shows e-book growth is slowing. "Now a normal means of consuming content and offering consumers a broad range of reading options, ebook growth has slowed and currently comprises about 30% of books sold," the report says.

But Amazon and Barnes & Noble, listen up. The study also sheds some light on what exactly consumers want from their e-books, and what they'd be willing to pay more for. Specifically, readers are seeking more value from e-books. Forty-eight percent of respondents said they would pay more for a print book bundled with an e-book than they would for either product separately. Amazon seems to have caught on to this with the recent release of its Kindle MatchBook, a service that allows customers to buy digital copies of physical books bought from Amazon for $2.99 or less.

People also want to be able to recycle their e-books. A little more than half of survey respondents say they'd pay more for an e-book if they could give it away or resell it once finished.

Amazon and Barnes & Noble, the two biggest players in e-reading devices, are aggressively pushing new products into the market. Amazon recently launched a new version of the Kindle Paperwhite, while Barnes & Noble released the Nook Simple Touch GlowLight. Both devices primarily feature display improvements.

[Image: Flickr User Let Ideas Compete]

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