Say what you like about the elusive Bristol-born artist, but he's a funny guy. "Some people criticize me for using sources that are a bit lowbrow (this quote is from 'Gladiator') but you know what?," he wrote. "'I'm just going to use that hostility to make me stronger, not weaker' as Kelly Rowland said on the X Factor."

[Image: Banksy]

October 22. The artist used a pile of breeze blocks to make a 1:36 version of the great Sphinx of Giza next to a fetid pool. "You are advised not to drink the arab spring water," he wrote.

[Image: Banksy]

Is this the art itself or was the art for October 23 canceled due to the boys in blue? To answer this question, Banksy would need to tell us whether his art is premeditated or spontaneous.

[Image: Banksy]

The artist managed to stencil this on the shutter of the Hustler Club in Hell's Kitchen without attracting unwanted attention--just like the subject of the painting.

[Image: Banksy]

Banksy's final piece was a balloon of his name written in bubble lettering. "I know street art can feel increasingly like the marketing wing of an art career, so I wanted to make some art without the price tag attached," he told an interviewer last month. "There's no gallery show or book or film. It's pointless. Which hopefully means something."

[Image: Banksy]

Banksy wrote a critique of the construction of the "new World Trade Center" for the New York Times's op-ed pages. It got spiked.

[Image: Banksy]

The city's iconic "I Heart NY" T-shirts were given a makeover by the artist. Take the JPEG to a copy story and do it yourself, he suggested.

[Image: Banksy]

This graffiti-skinned panther went up outside the Yankee stadium on October 30.

[Image: Banksy]

And finally, here's the "vandalized" chocolate-box landscape, complete with Nazi staring at the view. Entitled "The banality of the banality of evil," it was signed by the artist...

[Image: Banksy]

...before being returned to the Housing Works charity shop on East 23rd street. Last night, it was sold on an auction website for over $600,000, with the money going to help the homeless of New York.

[Image: Banksy]

Banksy's Month-Long Residency In NYC Ends With A $600,000 Sale Of One Artwork

Here, a look at some of the work he left behind.

He brought his graffiti-inspired show to the city where the art form was born, and yesterday, Banksy signed off with a mixed-media piece made to look like the ubiquitous bubble tags found on so many of New York's walls. The British artist debuted around 30 new artworks—most were sprayed or stenciled on the walls, some took the form of videos, and others were canvases or other media hung in incongruous settings around the five boroughs. And a few New Yorkers will be chuffed to discover that the $60 canvases they bought from a stall in Central Park were in fact Banksy originals.

But perhaps the climax to the month-long show was a banal landscape that Banksy bought from a thrift shop, "vandalized" and then returned to the shop, on East 23rd Street. The work, entitled The banality of the banality of evil, was auctioned last night, with a winning bid of $615,000. The money will be given to the Housing Works charity.

[Image: Banksy]

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  • NobodyGetsOutAlive

    The painting follows the plot of an early directorial debut from Steven Spielburg of an episode of 'Night Gallery'. The theme of the Night Gallery painting surrounds the Doomed Fate of a Nazi SS Guard in hiding in Caracas.