Google Just Made Another Huge Investment In Solar Energy

Google will invest $103 million in Mount Signal Solar for a California-based project that, upon completion, will provide 80,000 homes with clean energy.

Early Thursday morning, Google announced it was investing $103 million in Mount Signal Solar, a plant which claims its finished project will source enough energy for about 80,000 homes on the San Diego Gas & Electric line. In a blog post, Kojo Ako-Asare, head of corporate finance at Google, said Google was "celebrating Halloween early with [their] 'lucky thirteenth' renewable energy investment."

Google has now invested more than $1 billion in renewable energy. In 2011, the enterprise pledged $168 million to BrightSource Energy for the Mojave Desert-based Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, which was slated for completion in 2013. Though, according to Ivanpah's website, the mirror-reflecting panels are still in the testing phase. (In September Ivanpah reached a milestone of synching the power grid with the station; this was their first output of energy.)

Large companies like Google and Ikea are aligned to market efficient energy to the masses, which is excellent news for the environment. It doesn't seem to hurt their global image either.

Speaking on behalf of Google, Ako-Asare said, "We invest in these projects because they make business sense, because they help put more renewable energy on the grid, and because they have a positive impact on the local economies where they operate." Coincidentally, both of Google's most recent and largest energy investments seem to benefit Californians, the state that Google calls home.

[Image courtesy of Google]

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8 Comments

  • Amy Malloy

    Well-known brands throughout America are taking notice of solar and putting it to use to strengthen brand image, protect the environment, and boost the economy. A recent report from SEIA and Vote Solar, titled Solar Means Business, highlights the growth and success of solar in corporate America. http://www.everblue.edu/blog/a... Do you think the trend will continue and maybe move more into the small business sector too?

  • north american

    Looking at that picture, I think of how many trees were cut down for all those wooden posts, and I think about how what looks like very good farm land is now no longer available for use. The wooden posts appear to be treated with copper chromate (A toxin that leaches into surrounding soil.). So much heat rises off of that many solar panels that it changes the weather in the area too (drier).

  • north american

    there is plenty of south facing sloped land that would be perfect for such an installation, no need to waste good farm land. Paul, your a douche bag in the worst sense.