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52. Kyle Cooper

President of Prologue Films

  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
  • <p>Prologue Films</p>
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"My job is to make people in the theater feel like they don't want to be anywhere else," says Kyle Cooper. He means from the beginning of a film to its very end: His specialty is the opening and closing credits. His fantasias include the immersion into a serial killer's mind in Seven, the symbolic web title sequences in the Spider-Man movies, and Tom Cruise's hip-hop spoof at the end of Tropic Thunder. Cooper's talent is such that he's now being tasked not just with a film's start and finish but also its middle: Julie Taymor gave him responsibility for all the visual effects in her version of The Tempest, out this year. — by Jennifer Vilaga

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