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91. Will Allen

Chief executive officer of Growing Power

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If it were up to Will Allen, low-income urbanites would be cultivating fresh fruit, vegetables, and fish in community centers, in empty lots, even on their own rooftops. "People don't realize that cities originally produced the food," says Allen, an urban-farming expert who has pioneered a local-farming movement. Rather than bringing people back to the land, Allen's methods of growing food and teaching urban cultivation are transforming the way low-income families can get safe, affordable meals. "Obesity, diabetes, and inadequate nutrition are increasing at an alarming rate, especially for the poor and people of color," he says. He considers it a civil rights issue. "I'm interested in creating a more just food system. How do we get the same food to all people?"