Creative Conversation: Robert Reich and Jacob Kornbluth, From the New Documentary "Inequality For All"

In a year awash with Hollywood sequels—three of the top five grossing movies so far—director Jacob Kornbluth and former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich have created a truly original film.

In a year awash with Hollywood sequels—three of the top five grossing movies so far—director Jacob Kornbluth and former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich have created a truly original film: a documentary about the economy with clever infographics, sure, but also plenty of drama, heartbreak, and even humor. Inequality for All, which opens in select cities this Friday, stars Reich, a longtime economist and currently a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He leads viewers on a complex and at times personal narrative about how the U.S. economy has created the worst income disparity in a hundred years.

Recently, Kornbluth and Reich visited Fast Company for our Creative Conversation series to talk about the project.

"I have a little fatigue, as I think a lot of people do, when they hear the words 'issue-driven' films," Kornbluth said. "They think they aren't going to see a movie that's entertaining. This had to be fun."

So no, their documentary isn't An Inconvenient Truth for the economy. "I have enormous respect for the director and for Al Gore, but I wouldn't say An Inconvenient Truth is exactly entertaining."

Be sure to read Reich and Kornbluth’s extended conversation in the November issue of Fast Company, and a second video of them here. They’ll talk about their passion for equality and why, despite how divisive and seemingly intractable the problem of inequality is, they’re optimistic things will change.

For more information about Inequality for All, distributed by Radius TWC, go to Inequalityforall.com.

Add New Comment

1 Comments

  • Dave Fowler

    The background music adds nothing, sounds like a cheap sound library clip, and worse is a huge distraction. In frustration I gave up watching two thirds of the way through.