Netflix's Instant Queue Just Got A Little Bit Smarter

Two of the video streamer's existing features are being combined, meaning it will know more about what you want to watch than you do yourself.

Netflix, which is doing all sorts of things right in the streaming world right now, has been playing around with its already clever algorithm to combine what you're watching with what you say you want to watch. The Queen of Stream currently allows U.S. users to compile their own viewing wishlist, which it calls an Instant Queue, as well as use the Netflix algorithm to predict what individual users want to watch, based on their viewing history.

But now the idea is to combine the two features, meaning that Netflix will predict which films or shows you are most likely to want to watch and then push them to the top of the queue. Anyone not so comfortable with the idea of someone else sorting out their top picks can revert to sorting their list manually, under the My List heading. The firm is debuting other clever little tweaks, including a feature that shows you which of their offerings are about to disappear from Netflix as their licensing rights expire.

[Image: Netflix]

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2 Comments

  • Amf10

    "My List" is stupid. I had everything arranged in a specific order and now I have no idea what order it is in.

  • Chris Roeszler

    I thought after reading this it would automatically change, which I don't want. I checked my queue, it's still my order and shows an option to change to Netflix's new sorting option. I'll keep an eye on this. :)

    As for the expiring items, this has been in place for a while. About a week before you could see a show or movie was expiring in your queue list. If you checked the individual show page, I think it was two weeks out that you'd see this.

    What I'm hoping for is what Hulu does now; seeing this information as soon as they know when it will expire, even if it's 2 - 3 years out. For everything I have in queue, I'd much rather be "forced" to watch something expiring in three weeks or at least being made aware of it sooner. When you get caught off-guard with a 100+ episode series where each episode is 40 - 50 minutes long, you can't exactly cram that in the final week. It's worse when the show isn't available by DVD, or only the first season is.