NASA Visualizes 130 Years of Climate Change in 30 Seconds

From 1800 to 2011, the surface temperature for Earth rose almost 1 degree Celsius.

Collecting surface temperature records from more than 1,000 weather stations dating back to 1880, NASA has compiled a video visualizing 130 years of climate change.

Featured on NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day site, the video's yellow and red hues represent warmer temperatures relative to local average temperatures in the mid-1900s. By the 20th century, the change accelerated, with NASA noting that most of the warmest years on record have occurred in the recent past. From 1800 to 2011, global temperatures increased almost 1 degree Celsius (that difference is 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit). These changes have been linked to extreme weather events, such as Superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Katrina.

Earlier this week, Stanford scientists warned that climate change is expected to hasten at a rate 10 times faster than any shifts that have occurred within the last 65 million years. By the end of the 21st century, temperatures could rise 5 to 6 degrees Celsius.

Correction: This post previously noted the conversion and not the difference for 1 degree Celsius to Fahrenheit.

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7 Comments

  • Apachecav

    Wow NASA had accurate temp monitoring stations in the 1800's? Well if they did some how they lost the technology and common sense to deploy them. The instances of recording devices placed within 5 feet of heat ex-changers and others housed in metal weather stations is so pervasive that NO data collected can be accurate to any degree. So either they where stupid to place them there or they where placed there to cook the books so to speak. Either way, real scientist just need to start over....

  • ColoradoChick

    The problem with this study is that the representation is such a small chunk of the Earth's surface temperature. We would need to compile hundreds of years of surface temperatures, variances, and the rise or fall of a Celsius to see if this finding truly is an impact or a norm. 

  • Matt VA

    This subtitle is hilariously miscalculated. It rose up 1 degree Celsius, not TO 1 degree Celsius. The temperature 1°C is 33.8°F, but,
    +1°C = +1.8°F.

    —Checking now, I see it's addressed, thank you :^)

  • @brentwgraham

    And yet, even in light of this. We'll continue worrying about GDP and employment numbers...

    We're doomed.