A few designers at the software development startup Sourcebits reimagined Google Glass as a device mainstream consumers might actually want to wear.

The sleek glasses are reminiscent of those sold by hipster eyewear purveyor Warby Parker.

Warby Parker was reported to be in talks with Google in February to design a more stylish version of the headset.

Would You Wear Google Glass If It Looked Like This?

A few designers at the software development startup Sourcebits reimagine a version of Google's headset that you'd actually want to wear.

Whether or not you're sold on the technology behind Google Glass, it's hard to argue the headset is anywhere close to fashionable. Even Google's own developers won't be seen wearing Glass.

So a few designers at the software development startup Sourcebits reimagined Google Glass as a device mainstream consumers might actually want to wear.

These sleek glasses aren't associated with Google in any way, but they are reminiscent of the specs sold by hipster eyewear purveyor Warby Parker, which was reported to be in talks with Google in February to design a more stylish version of the headset.

Google Glass won't go on sale to the public until at least the end of this year, but some have already questioned whether or not it has a branding problem, driven in part by an aesthetic that has "all the sex appeal of orthodontic headgear."

Would you wear a version of Google Glass that looked like this? Tell us in the comments.

[Images: Sourcebits]

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28 Comments

  • Renato Murakami

    Useless... design for design's sake.

    There's a reason why Google didn't just make a glasses-looking Google Glass. You can't fit electronics in that shape, and you can't make all functions (like bone conducting audio, and the touchpad thing) work in something like that.
    The visor/screen only works at a certain distance from your eyes, thus the big piece in front.
    On that matter, I'd also wear a Google Glass that was the size and shape of contact glasses. Since we still can't have something like that with current technology, it's not a real question.

  • Nathan Mirolo

    I would be less likely to wear this redesigned version. After wearing Glass in it's current configuration only a few people actually notice you are wearing them and you have the added benefit of being able to switch the lens.

  • Amanda Connell

    absolutely. the version the googlers are testing with at the moment (and I know a handful) is just... too obvious. where is the fun in having it be clear to everyone that you are scoping them out via techno-visual profiling? the REAL FUN is in having it be a hidden asset. make it more like spygear, or just don't bother 

  • Marcus Goodyear

    I've got Google Glass now, and I look forward to new designs in the future. People who hate the current design don't seem to understand that this is really a beta product. As a result its current design is all about functionality rather than aesthetic.

  • mark kobylanski

    A lot of the stuff I would like to wear these for is action based, so I don't want a pair of hipster glasses, what I need is something unobtrusive and flexible that is held in place solidly. All of this is missed by these designs... Wheres the action version? All the ads show people doing awesome stuff that you would want to share but where is the appropriate design?

  • Guest

    I didn't know it needed an aesthetic upgrade. I thought seeing the world through a minuture computer, similar to James Cameron's Terminator, would be enough.

  • s0na

    This design assumes you are a user that already wears prescription glasses? I think its rather dorky to have on a pair of glasses with no lens.

  • s0na

    Didn't say the original version wasn't dorky at all, it is. I'm just responding to the new design which is still dorky.