Nokia Lumia 1020

The new flagship Windows Phone device from the Finnish smartphone maker features a 41-megapixel camera and apps and accessories tailored to photography buffs.

Nokia Lumia 1020

The new flagship Windows Phone device from the Finnish smartphone maker features a 41-megapixel camera and apps and accessories tailored to photography buffs.

See how the Lumia 1020's new zoom feature works.

The new flagship Windows Phone device from the Finnish smartphone maker features a 41-megapixel camera and apps and accessories tailored to photography buffs.

Nokia's Lumia 1020 Is A Pro Camera Disguised As A Smartphone

The smartphone maker's flagship Lumia 1020 Windows Phone boasts a 41-megapixel camera. It also comes with lots of apps and accessories for the photography buff—except Instagram.

Nokia unveiled the Lumia 1020 at a press event today in New York (though not before it was leaked).

The $300 Windows Phone, which will be available exclusively through AT&T starting July 26, has a single, obvious killer feature: a 41-megapixel camera that essentially makes the 1020 a professional-grade camera masquerading as a smartphone. Nokia is also releasing a Pro Camera app packed with granular features to make photography buffs geek out, such as controls for shutter speed, white balance, and manual focus.

The Lumia 1020 isn't Nokia's first 41-megapixel camera phone: Its PureView 808 came out in early 2012, the last smartphone to operate on the Symbian operating system. But this time around, it's clear Nokia is betting Lumia's camera will sell itself.

Among the smartphone's other accessories are a camera mount with a shutter button and a tripod mount; apps for the Lumia include many photography and photo-sharing apps like Path, Panagraph, and an exclusive app from Hipstamatic called Oggl Pro.

One conspicuously missing app? Instagram. CEO Kevin Systrom has told Fast Company the photo-sharing app will likely come to the Windows Phone and Blackberry platforms before it arrives on Google's Glass headset, but he hedged that statement by adding: "I'm not saying those will come anytime soon. I’m just saying that in order of priority, the way we evaluate where to expand to is really simply where our users are, and where the growth is."

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3 Comments

  • Renato Murakami

    For photographers out there reading this: forget about the marketing buzz word of 41Mpx.

    It packs a 1/1.2" sensor which is almost 4x bigger than the sensor on the latest iPhone or Android smartphone cameras.
    No, it's no dSLR... it's probably still about 5x smaller than APS-C, significantly smaller than micro 4/3rds sensor, but still a big step beyond what any other smartphone out there can do right now.
    I can attest to it's quality because I own a 808, which has the exact same sensor, and made several comparisons to pics taken with other people's phone.
    For those looking for real life test situations on this new phone, it's probably good enough if you look for tests on the 808 - it's the same sensor after all, though I think Nokia upgraded several stuff on the software side, plus included OIS and worked on the glass a bit further. Seems they improved a lot on low light, which was good but not great on 808.
    I'm getting the 1020 as soon as I can, sending my 808 back to my mom... she'll make good use of the great pics, but she doesn't have that much use for Windows, so a perfect match. :)

  • Ben

    The camera oversamples the data from the sensor.  You don't end up with a 41MP picture.  You end up with an 8MP picture.  The extra pixels are used to determine noise reduction information, and for the zoom feature.

  • TrueCopy

    No. 41 megapixels doesn't make it "professional grade." It's all in the quality of the optics and the sensor. Does it make it a good camera with a new level of image control? Yes. But professional? No.