In a trick that harks back to the heyday of radio, the new SoundTracking update allows you to send a track to a special someone as either a private or public dedication.

The company is also adding hashtag support for tagging music.

SoundTracking said it got the idea for the song dedication option by watching the app's users "flirt with each other."

Sharing Music Is Personal, And SoundTracking Is Using That To Its Advantage

Music discovery app SoundTracking borrows the old dedicate-a-song-to-a-loved one radio trick.

SoundTracking is already a highly successful app that taps right into the music sharing and discovery model that's evolving right now, with players like Tumblr and Twitter getting into the game. But the app has just been updated with some features that turbocharge the business of music discovery and highlight that this is a trend that's only going to get bigger.

SoundTracking's new social emphasis lets you ask other users what they're listening to—and in a trick that harks back to the heyday of radio, you can also send a track to a special someone as either a private or public dedication. The company is also adding hashtag support for tagging music, and has boosted the speed of its music recognition system so that it in effect recognizes the tune playing on your phone even before you tap on the Music ID button (following in the footsteps of Shazam's app).

But in an email to Fast Company the company underlines that these moves are merely "our first experiment at creating a more direct and personal messaging experience and you'll see more exploration around this in the future." SoundTracking said it got the idea for the song dedication option by watching the app's users "flirt with each other, offer emotional support to each other, and joke around with each other...using songs as the common language."

Lest you doubt the rise of the social music discovery platform, the company also shared some stats that point out how the system works: Over 90% of its music activity is shared through third-party social networks like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Foursquare. And the company has also been surprisingly successful at getting its users to add location data: Over 60% of its updates are tagged with a city, neighborhood, or venue tag—a figure the company believes is the "highest percentage of location tagging among social sharing communities."

[Image: By Flickr user giuliaduepuntozero]

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