Signs, banners, and costumes have extra importance in a protest without a unified, catchy message or agreed-upon list of demands. These are the ones we found that stand out and offer concrete clues to the general frustration felt by the demonstrators.

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Also In This Package

The Inside Story Of Occupy Wall Street (Oct. 7) Fast Company reporter Sean Captain was at the occupation from day one and looks back on a series of moments that made the movement feel different than any other action he'd covered or participated in before. 

The Signs Of Occupy Wall Street (Oct. 7) Signs, banners, and costumes have extra importance in a protest without a unified, catchy message or agreed-upon list of demands. [Slideshow]

The Stealth Leaders Of Occupy Wall Street (Oct. 7) The movement aimed at calling attention to injustice in the American financial system prides itself onhaving no central leadership, and it's been criticized for having no central message. Here's how it's working anyway--and changing the way we think of protests. 

Occupy Wall Street: Tahrir Over Here? (Sept. 21) Yahoo blocked emails related to the ongoing protests on Wall Street. Meanwhile, attendees have been dealing with another problem: American protest rallies rely on mass media, not social media. 

Protest On Wall Street Is Louder Online Than Off (Sept. 19) A modest, recession-inspired demonstration grabs plenty of online attention. Is the future of activism more digital than physical?