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How to Rehabilitate and Move a Wounded Wild Tiger

  • This past January, WWFUS CEO Carter Roberts went to Nepal to bring a rehabilitated tiger back into the wild. The pictures from the journey are ahead, but Roberts's story is <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/1734387/how-the-wwf-translocated-a-wounded-wild-tiger-in-nepal" target="_self">here.</a>

Goal One: Translocate rehabilitated tiger from Chitwan National Park (A) to Bardia National Park (B).
  • Begin process of knowing the location and movements of all of the world’s 3,200 wild tigers.
  • Reestablish connectivity and ecological integrity in a landscape amidst a crush of humanity.
  • The veterinarian team prepares the ketamine tranquilizer for the male tiger.
  • Data collection begins.
  • Self explanatory!
  • WWF’s President and CEO Carter Roberts affixes GPS collar and satellite transmission device.
  • Still sedated, the tiger is loaded onto the truck and the long westward journey begins.
  • WWF Nepal team discuss the Terai and steps to restore landscapes between parks.
  • The groggy tiger is hauled in the vehicle announcing “Conservation for Development.”
  • The National Park directors from Chitwan and Bardia formalize the tiger’s translocation.
  • The team takes to the trees for a relatively safe viewing of the release.
  • After a brief hesitation, the tiger glides through the forest.  The translocation is a success.
  • Bidding the tracking team farewell as they set off to follow the tiger with telemetry.
  • The team celebrates the first of many collaring and translocations of tigers in Nepal.
  • Communities celebrate the restoration work throughout the Terai Arc landscape following the release.
  • Communities throughout the Terai welcome the prospects of more productive forests.
  • The tiger, named Namo Buddha, enjoying the benefits of a more-intact landscape. <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/1734387/how-the-wwf-translocated-a-wounded-wild-tiger-in-nepal"><strong>Read more about the translocation process here</strong></a>.
  • 01 /18 | Goal One This past January, WWFUS CEO Carter Roberts went to Nepal to bring a rehabilitated tiger back into the wild. The pictures from the journey are ahead, but Roberts's story is here. Goal One: Translocate rehabilitated tiger from Chitwan National Park (A) to Bardia National Park (B).
  • 02 /18 | Goal Two Begin process of knowing the location and movements of all of the world’s 3,200 wild tigers.
  • 03 /18 | Goal Three Reestablish connectivity and ecological integrity in a landscape amidst a crush of humanity.
  • 04 /18 | The Nepalese Team The veterinarian team prepares the ketamine tranquilizer for the male tiger.
  • 05 /18 | Success with the Sedative Data collection begins.
  • 06 /18 | Paw Self explanatory!
  • 07 /18 | Collaring WWF’s President and CEO Carter Roberts affixes GPS collar and satellite transmission device.
  • 08 /18 | Preparing for the Journey Still sedated, the tiger is loaded onto the truck and the long westward journey begins.
  • 09 /18 | The Plan WWF Nepal team discuss the Terai and steps to restore landscapes between parks.
  • 10 /18 | The Procession Across the Terai The groggy tiger is hauled in the vehicle announcing “Conservation for Development.”
  • 11 /18 | A Formal Exchange The National Park directors from Chitwan and Bardia formalize the tiger’s translocation.
  • 12 /18 | Taking to the Trees The team takes to the trees for a relatively safe viewing of the release.
  • 13 /18 | He’s Off After a brief hesitation, the tiger glides through the forest. The translocation is a success.
  • 14 /18 | The Tracking Team Bidding the tracking team farewell as they set off to follow the tiger with telemetry.
  • 15 /18 | It Takes and Army The team celebrates the first of many collaring and translocations of tigers in Nepal.
  • 16 /18 | A Joyous Occasion Communities celebrate the restoration work throughout the Terai Arc landscape following the release.
  • 17 /18 | Terai Communities Embracing the Need for Forests Communities throughout the Terai welcome the prospects of more productive forests.
  • 18 /18 | The Tiger A Week After the Translocation The tiger, named Namo Buddha, enjoying the benefits of a more-intact landscape. Read more about the translocation process here.

Pictures from the WWF's tiger translocation adventures this past January, courtesy of CEO Carter Roberts.

Slideshow Credits: 01 / Carter Roberts; 02 / Carter Roberts; 03 / Carter Roberts; 04 / Carter Roberts; 05 / Carter Roberts; 06 / Carter Roberts; 07 / Carter Roberts; 08 / Carter Roberts; 09 / Carter Roberts; 10 / Carter Roberts; 11 / Carter Roberts; 12 / Carter Roberts; 13 / Carter Roberts; 14 / Carter Roberts; 15 / Carter Roberts; 16 / Carter Roberts; 17 / Carter Roberts; 18 / Carter Roberts;

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