Linked In
Let's be honest: you're having second thoughts about Facebook. Those of us that rushed into the great social networking boom were thrilled at first with the ability to find co-workers online, until we realized that, well, the Big Blue social network is a little bit NSFW. Switching to LinkedIn is an option, but it feels a little handing in your keys to the party bus; the "business" social network is famous for being squeaky-clean and private, but it's also totally boring out of the box. Here are eight ways to dress it up and make it feel like a real online home -- one where someone won't leave pictures of bikinis or barf on your wall.
Box.net
Box.net integrates with LinkedIn, letting you host files right on your LinkedIn page. Sales materials, press releases, resume -- embed whatever you want right there in your profile so that your LinkedIn contacts can download them straight from your page. If you don’t have a Box.net account, it’s free to set up with 1GB of online storage.
CardMunch
CardMunch is an iPhone app that digitizes business cards. It’s simple: you aim the iPhone’s camera at the card, snap a photo, and watch the entry appear in your address book 10 minutes later. (Each one is read by a human being remotely and transcribed for accuracy, hence the delay). Because CardMunch has LinkedIn support built-in, it can connect those business cards to your contacts online profiles, and it’s pretty cheap too: only $10 to snap 40 business cards.
Wordpress
If you or your company have a blog, you can embed it on your LinkedIn profile and all the posts will sync automatically. Don’t want every single post showing up under your name? You can set it so that only blog posts with certain tags get pushed to your profile.
Worldmate
Worldmate is one of the more popular travel apps for Blackberry, letting you manage your itineraries straight from your phone. But the app also has LinkedIn support baked in, allowing you to see if you’re going to cross paths with any of your contacts during your travels, or which one of those contacts lives in the cities you’re visiting. We’re pretty sure they won’t mind you dropping in -- unless, of course, you manage them. Versions for iPhone, Android and other phones are available, too. Price: $1 from the app stores.
Huddle
Huddle is cloud-based project management software that includes phone and Web conferencing, making it perfect for consultants. Not only that, members of your Huddle team are connected with their LinkedIn accounts, meaning that you, your employees and your external clients and consultants can all share files between LinkedIn accounts. Price: $8 a month per user for Enterprise account.
Hellotxt
Hello text lets you post to any social networking thing you imagine. If you can write in it, you can post to it with HelloText. Let’s say you have a LinkedIn profile where you like to update your status, but you also have a company Yammer account, a Wordpress blog, a Brightkite profile and a personal Tumblr? Yup, you can post to all of them this single app for iOS and Android. For some reason, you can also doodle with your finger and send the images to your contacts. Price on the iTunes App Store: Free.
Behance
If you have a profile of work, there is no reason it shouldn’t be visible to your social graph. That’s the mission of Behance, a platform for creative professionals that lets users embed galleries of their work in their LinkedIn profiles, right where prospective clients can see. Right now, Behance is by invitation only, but you can request one here.

7 Ways to Survive the Switch to LinkedIn

Let's be honest: you're having second thoughts about Facebook. Those of us that rushed into the great social networking boom were thrilled at first with the ability to find co-workers online, until we realized that, well, the Big Blue social network is a little bit NSFW. Switching to LinkedIn is an option, but it feels a little handing in your keys to the party bus; the "business" social network is famous for being squeaky-clean and private, but it's also totally boring out of the box. Here are eight ways to dress it up and make it feel like a real online home — one where someone won't leave pictures of bikinis or barf on your wall.

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