Shanghai World Expo Photo Contest Contributors

When the World Expo opens on May 1, one of the most exciting pavilions is likely to be the one sponsored by the Chinese corporate community. The "Dream Cube," as it's been dubbed, is a massive building whose 5K square meter shell is made of recycled CD cases, and whose exterior LED lights are controlled by the movements of the people inside. If they clap, it changes color, like a sci fi riff on Tinkerbell. The dazzling interactivity comes from the fertile brain of Edwin Schlossberg and his partners at New York-based design firm ESI Design, in collaboration with Chinese architect Yung Ho Chang, who just happens to be chair of the architecture school at MIT.

The pavilion, which is conceived of as a dreamy walk through Chinese history, incorporates thousands of photographs submitted by the Chinese public. This slideshow previews a few.

Chinese citizens were invited to submit pictures of their favorite aspects of Chinese life. More than 20,000 people contributed to the effort.
Shanghai Expo Dreamers' Path
As visitors walk through the Dreamers' Path, they're treated to a tour through Chinese history and culture, with interactive displays along the way.
A Shanghai Family
Photo contributed for the exhibit.
Busy
Photo contributed for the exhibit.
Chinese Opera
Photo contributed for the exhibit.
Line of the City
Photo contributed for the exhibit.
Hair Cutting
Photo contributed for the exhibit.
Migrant workers
Photo contributed for the exhibit.
Nanjing Road
Photo contributed for the exhibit.
Praying
Photo contributed for the exhibit.
Shanghai Dreamers' Path - Fall
As visitors walk along the Dreamers' Path, they can wave their hands, and fiber optic tubes will respond.

Fast Company

Shanghai's World Expo Dream Cube...by New York's ESI Design

When the World Expo opens on May 1, one of the most exciting pavilions is likely to be the one sponsored by the Chinese corporate community. The "Dream Cube," as it's been dubbed, is a massive building whose 5K square meter shell is made of recycled CD cases, and whose exterior LED lights are controlled by the movements of the people inside. If they clap, it changes color, like a sci fi riff on Tinkerbell. The dazzling interactivity comes from the fertile brain of Edwin Schlossberg and his partners at New York-based design firm ESI Design, in collaboration with Chinese architect Yung Ho Chang, who just happens to be chair of the architecture school at MIT. The pavilion, which is conceived of as a dreamy walk through Chinese history, incorporates thousands of photographs submitted by the Chinese public. This slideshow previews a few.

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