Chris Jordan's body of photographic artwork focuses on the startling statistics of American consumption. Numbers are translated into visual representations--what would all the pollution in the ocean look like? How much space would five seconds of waste take up?
Some of these depictions take up whole walls of gallery space. Here are some of the images from Jordan's latest book, Running the Numbers.
How many plastic bags are in this image?
60,000: the number of plastic bags used in the U.S. every 5 seconds.
How many plastic bottles are in this image?
2 million: the number of plastic beverage bottles used in the U.S. every 5 minutes.
How many plastic cups are in this image?
1 million: the number of plastic cups used on airline flights in the U.S. every 6 hours.
How many Energizer batteries are in this image?
170,000: the number of disposable batteries produced every 15 minutes.
How many pieces of plastic are in this image?
2.4 million: the number of pounds of plastic that enter the world's oceans every hour.
All of the plastic in this image was collected from the Pacific Ocean.
How many light bulbs are in this image?
320,000: the number of kilowatt hours of electricity wasted in the U.S. every minute due to inefficient residential electricity usage, like inefficient wiring or computers in sleep mode.
How many packing peanuts are in this image?
166,000: the number of overnight packages shipped by air in the U.S. every hour.
How many cell phones are in this image?
426,000: the number of cell phones retired every day in the U.S.
How many cans are in this image?
106,000: the number of aluminum cans used in the U.S. every 30 seconds.
How many toy tigers are in this image?
How many of those tigers would fit in the blank space in the middle of the image?
3,200: the estimated number of tigers remaining on Earth.
40,000: the global tiger population in 1970.
More from our Inspired Ethonomics series

Portraits of Consumption: Visualizing the Statistics of Waste in America

Chris Jordan's body of photographic artwork focuses on the startling statistics of American consumption. Numbers are translated into visual representations—what would all the pollution in the ocean look like? How much space would five seconds of waste take up? Some of these depictions take up whole walls of gallery space. Here are some of the images from Jordan's latest book, Running the Numbers.

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