World's First 3-D-Printed Bullets Join A Growing DIY Arsenal

In a YouTube video, a gun enthusiast shows off shotgun slugs he claims came from a 3-D printer.

The growing arsenal of 3-D-printed weapons now includes homemade bullets. As highlighted by the Daily Dot, a Tennessee man recently posted a YouTube video demonstrating what kind of damage can be done (hint: a lot) by the plastic shell, created by 3-D-printing enthusiast Tony Griffy.

The fact that the plastic bullet is fired from a real gun is a twist on the approach you're probably more familiar with: a real bullet being shot from a 3-D-printed gun. That gun, dubbed "The Liberator," was first created by Defense Distributed, a firm that fashioned the weapon almost entirely from ABS plastic, using an $8,000 3-D printer.

The Liberator got a makeover this week when a fan took its blueprints and fashioned a $25 mostly-plastic pistol capable of shooting nine rounds, using a more affordable, consumer-grade Lulzbot printer.

The Liberator has garnered its fair share of criticism, with opposition from anti-gun supporters who fear the DIY weapons could fall into the wrong hands. It's reasonable to assume 3-D-printed bullets will be subject to similar criticism.

As the idea of 3-D home printing becomes more accessible than ever, do you think there should be regulations on what DIY printers should and shouldn't be allowed to create? Tell us in the comments.