Pulling An Anti-Yahoo, Congress Considers Telecommuting

A new proposal would allow members of Congress to debate, hold meetings, and vote from their home district offices. But if Marissa Mayer thinks Yahoo is too dysfunctional for it, what would telecommuting do to the most dysfunctional workplace on Earth?

Although Yahoo's Marissa Mayer is cracking down on remote employees, a new proposal could bring telecommuting to Capitol Hill. Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM) introduced a Congressional proposal last week for lawmakers to hold hearings, vote, and debate from remote terminals at their district offices. The Congressional telecommuting project is being touted as a cost-cutting measure which would allow representatives and senators to spend more time with constituents.

"Thanks to modern technology, members of Congress can debate, vote, and carry out their constitutional duties without having to leave the accountability and personal contact of their congressional districts," Pearce told The Hill's Jennifer Martinez in a statement. "Keeping legislators closer to the people we represent would pull back Washington's curtain and allow constituents to see and feel, first-hand, their government at work." Martinez also noted that Pearce unsuccessfully floated the proposal during the last session of Congress.

No word, yet, on how Pearce plans to pull off a proposal that would likely have every lobbyist in the Beltway lobbying against it.

[Image: Rep. Steve Pearce]

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7 Comments

  • Edward Y

    The
    less time politicians have to spend in the cesspool known as D.C., the
    better for us all. Not to mention the tons of greenhouse gas emissions
    that could be saved from the constant shuttling back and forth, the
    overhead of maintaining full staff in Washington, etc. There are plenty
    of ways to securely encrypt information already, just ask their friends
    at the NSA. As for whether or not they were actually working, in lieu of
    implementing a productivity measurement solution like MySammy, I'm of the belief that the less politicians
    work, the less damage they do to us by passing thousand page bills that
    further erode our rights and build up a fortress of bureaucratic red
    tape.

  • Edward Y

    The less time politicians have to spend in the cesspool known as D.C., the better for us all. Not to mention the tons of greenhouse gas emissions that could be saved from the constant shuttling back and forth, the overhead of maintaining full staff in Washington, etc. There are plenty of ways to securely encrypt information already, just ask their friends at the NSA. As for whether or not they were actually working, in lieu of implementing a productivity measurement solution like MySammy (http://www.mysammy.com), I'm of the belief that the less politicians work, the less damage they do to us by passing thousand page bills that further erode our rights and build up a fortress of bureaucratic red tape.

  • Primeoutsourcing

    This is wonderful idea that the congress of U.S.A never be in recess. Thanks for sharing.

  • Dwhooks

    The only possible good thing that could come from this would be we might all get high speed internet

  • Tom R. Saxe

    Actually, Terri, its a terrible idea; How are you going to keep them away from the cat vids and Bieber shots? Not to mention the other stuff....Seriously, if Mr. Pearce trusts internet apps to deliver confidential, personnel and security testimony as well as public, perhaps the GOP would trust an internet app with congressional apportionment based solely on US Census data.
    FC, here's the next idea: Why stop at 385 districts? Why not 100,000? That would require a new constitution, the end of political parties, a new meaning to "democracy".

  • terriador

    It's a wonderful idea.  Then Congress need never be in recess and President Obama won't be able to appoint undesirables without Congressional approval.