Social Media Takes Fun Out Of Super Bowl Ad Surprises

Debating an eternal question: Better to conceal or reveal?

As more and more of the ad spots for this year's Super Bowl are revealed, there is growing feeling that marketers' use of social media is ruining their surprises. Last Super Bowl, just one memorable ad bucked this trend—Chrysler's offering with Clint Eastwood—while other firms such as Honda made similar versions available on YouTube and Facebook. Loren Angelo, general manager-brand marketing for Audi, reckons that, with just 24-48 hours' worth of Internet chatter about the Super Bowl, the reveal is worth everything, allowing an advertiser to have "a much longer conversation with consumers."

Last week, CBS announced that all the spots, priced at over $3.5 million for a 30-second window, had sold out (although for the right price you could bump one of the existing brands out of their slots). And at its media day CBS also revealed some brands that are in—and some that are out.

What do you reckon? Should firms keep mum about their Super Bowl offerings, or are you in favor of the big reveal? Tweet us your replies to @FastCompany. Alternatively, you might want to leave a comment—unless you feel you'd ruin the surprise for us!

Related: It will be interesting to see if this year's Super Bowl breaks Twitter records again. Last year's event did the business, at 12,000-plus tweets per second. But it will have two political events—Obama's convention speech and the announcement of his second-term victory—to beat.

[Image via Flickr user Sister72]

Add New Comment

1 Comments

  • tpinsf

    I would have to agree with Loren from Audi. The upside of an extended period of consumer engagement and amplification through social is an opportunity rather than a risk. It can be argued that Audi's approach will only drive broader interest at tune-in, making the $3.5M spot a smarter investment. And we'll certainly see stronger attribution for that moving forward.