Fast Company

Self-Help for the Super-Stressed

Three ways to manage your on-the-job stress.

Web Site: Mind Tools Stress Management Page

What's There: A comprehensive review of the major causes of and methods for managing stress, from visualization and self-hypnosis to exercise and nutrition.

What's Best: The section on avoiding burnout, when "highly committed people lose interest and motivation." The site lists personality traits that put you at risk of burnout: you find it difficult to say "no," you micro-manage, you've been trying to achieve too much for too long. It also identifies symptoms: you cant keep up with commitments, you're losing a sense of purpose, you're increasingly detached from work and relationships.

Coordinates: Mind Tools, http://www.mindtools.com/smpage.html


Self Diagnostic: Carlson Coping and Stress Profile

What's There: A self-scored profile that will increase your awareness of on-the-job stress. Optional sections cover couple and family stress.

What's Best: Once you've identified the sources of your stress, the profile presents steps for developing coping skills. For example, if you find it hard to deal directly with difficult situations, work on problem-solving skills. A tip : separate people from the problem; attacking people creates conflict and even more stress.

Coordinates: $15 per profile. Respect, Inc., 302-892-9095; http://respectinc.com


Biofeedback Device: GSR2 Biofeedback Relaxation System

What's There: The GSR2 monitors the electrical resistance of your skin to gauge activity of your nervous system. Feeling testy? Insert two fingers into the palm-sized device, and it will indicate your stress level by emitting a high-pitched squeal through a pair of earplugs.

What's Best: Immediate feedback on your tension level. When deadlines hit and your heart starts racing, plug into the GSR2 to see if those deep-breathing exercises really work.

Coordinates: $60. Thought Technology in Montreal, 800-361-3651; http://www.aei.ca/~thought/tt2.htm

Add New Comment

0 Comments