Fast Company

Everplaces Creates A Pinterest For The Real World

The app lets you capture and store places in the physical world that you want to keep track of. "We wanted to make it easy to share 'insider tips,'" cofounder and CEO Tine Thygensen tells us.

How many times have you struggled to remember the name of that hole-in-the-wall with the decent beer but excellent dartboards? Or the dim sum place in New York whose location you wrote down somewhere but now can't recall where?

Everplaces is a new app that essentially functions as a Pinterest for the real world. It lets you capture and store places in the physical world that you want to keep track of, whether that's a swank bistro in your hometown or a boutique in Buenas Aires that always has the best cutting-edge fashions.

Available on the iPhone (with an Android version in the works), Everplaces is drop-dead simple: You capture locations either from the web, or by searching for them, or importing them from places you've already stored in Google MyMaps. You can add notes, as well as your own photos, to each record. Then when you need to remember where that place is, you just open the app and find it. 

"We wanted to make it easy to share 'insider tips,'" cofounder and CEO Tine Thygensen tells Fast Company, "like where's great for brunch (but awful for drinks), what's good if there's afternoon sun, where to have the pancakes, or which restaurants are great for a quiet dinner versus good for parties with groups."

Since its beta launched in December, the system is now in use 65 countries around the world, with the U.S. and Germany leading the charge. Top cities are New York, San Francisco, London, and Berlin, followed by Copenhagen (where Everplaces is based), Austin, TX, Jeddah, Orlando, and Toronto.

Almost a third of the 45,000 places saved so far are food-related, Thygesen says. Art is popular as well, and users have been requesting categories for Architecture and Design.

While refining the idea behind the app, Thygesen and her founding team discovered that around 20% of users struggled to keep track of places they wanted to remember, so much so that they developed workarounds, like adding notes about places to their calendars or note apps. "That told us the problem was big," Thygesen says.

[Image: Front page: Flickr user Terence S. Jones. This page: Everplaces]

E.B. Boyd is FastCompany.com's Silicon Valley reporter. Twitter | Google+ | Email

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5 Comments

  • James Creedy

    Google Maps has allowed you to 'star' any place/business in the world for years, and they're all backed up in your GMail.  

  • cia

    Oh man, I was able to import all MyMaps from Google and it's SO AWESOME so far! I always save my travel stuff and my friends always ask me for recommendations--Everplaces make them so much prettier! Check it out https://everplaces.com/cia

  • Mark Von Der Linn

    Seems to focus on letting user bookmark places THEY care about (as opposed to searching for new places as you do w yelp). Then the yelp stuff is there, too, for when you do want to search... as I understand it. But I'm not really a yelp a power user. I like their approach.