Work Smart: How To Find Your Sweet Spot

The greatest achievements happen in the overlap of three things: Your genuine interests, skills, and opportunities. To find success, work within your overlap.

Imagine a Venn diagram of three overlapping circles, one for your genuine interests, one for your skills, and one for the stream of opportunities available to you. Just two overlaps won't do it--a love for basketball and a connection to an NBA scout isn't enough--you've got to find your trifecta. In this episode, I explain how to identify all three overlaps, and how to find your sweet spot.

Scott is the author of the national best-selling book Making Ideas Happen and CEO of Behance, a company that develops products and services for creative industries. Behance's products include the Behance Network, the world's leading platform for creative professionals to showcase their work, and The 99%, a think tank and annual conference focused on leadership and execution in the creative world.

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2 Comments

  • Dr. Joseph Harder

    Thanks, appreciated the video. 

    An interesting snippet, and it rings true.  A related way of looking at it is to take Jim Collins' three intersecting circles for finding a company's Core BHAG (R) and apply them at the individual level.

    Where are you personally passionate (interests), genetically-encoded to perform (or among the best in the world...skills), and what will you find rewarding, monetarily or otherwise (related to, but slightly different than opportunities)?

    And while Chris's comment is a different take on "Sweet Spot," his points merit consideration as well.

    Happy holidays to all!

  • Chris Reich

    I did some research on this and found that people have a rhythm to their day. No real surprise there except that not everyone has the same rhythm through a day. Some people work well in the morning, some peak in the afternoon, others at night.

    Businesses need to utilize a more flexible work day to maximize the productivity possible.

    Chris Reich
    www.TeachU.com