Keys To Personal Branding Success, Part Two

In our last article, we began examining the critical elements that make up a successful branding campaign. While no two branding campaigns are exactly the same, the reality is that virtually no branding campaign will succeed if it is lacking in any of these elements. Previously, we discussed the first three components: a branding campaign must boost credibility, increase visibility, and have a strong appeal to the selected target market. Today we are going to discuss the final three elements that must be present in a personal branding campaign if it is to be successful:

A strong personal branding campaign must brand the individual as an expert in his or her industry. 
Think about the last time you had to choose a doctor, a tax accountant, a lawyer, a financial advisor, or some other service provider. If your choice was between three average professionals and one recognized expert, which would you choose?  or most people, the answer is obvious—whenever possible, we prefer to do business with experts. Your personal branding campaign must brand YOU as a recognized expert in your industry. Consider the legendary small business consultant Michael Gerber, the author of E-Myth.  He didn’t settle for writing a bestseller--he parlayed that success into a personal branding blitz that includes radio shows, television appearances, speaking gigs, and much more. He is an unquestioned expert in his field--largely because he has been proactive in branding himself that way. For many business owners, the world of social media is a fantastic place to begin branding yourself as an expert—in fact, recent statistics show that out of every six minutes spent online, one of them is spent on a social network. It’s a rapidly growing audience--get your message out there!   

An engaging personal branding campaign incorporates personality.  There is more to personal branding than making an individual into a highly visible and credible expert.  In addition, it is important to create a memorable brand. It doesn’t do much good to be considered an expert if everyone you meet forgets about you the very next day, does it? To address this challenge, a well-crafted personal branding campaign incorporates the individual’s personality into the brand that is being built. This can be done by focusing on your hobbies, your favorite sports teams, or your sense of humor, to name a few. The idea is to let your audience get to know your personality as well as your business acumen--so that you remain in the forefront of their mind long after you’ve met. A great example of this is Dallas Mavericks owner and entrepreneur Mark Cuban. There are 29 other owners in the NBA, but none with anywhere close to the name recognition as Cuban. What makes him different? He hasn’t been afraid to express his personality in the public square.

An effective personal branding campaign stays consistent.  This is an area in which many branding campaigns go off track. Remember that the goal of any branding campaign is shape the way an individual, product, or company is perceived by their audience. And while the first impression you make goes a long way towards establishing your brand, it takes consistent repetition to firmly establish any brand. If you are always changing up your brand, before long you won’t stand for anything. Once you have identified the brand you are seeking to build, it’s crucial that you stay consistent. Keep hammering your message home--and before long, your audience will perceive you exactly the way you want them to!

There are plenty of tactics to choose from when it comes to creating a personal branding campaign. But whatever route you decide to take, make sure that your campaign accomplishes these critical goals!

JW Dicks (@jwdicks) & Nick Nanton (@nicknanton) are best-selling authors who consult for small- and medium-sized businesses on how to build their business through Personality Driven Marketing, Personal Brand Positioning, Guaranteed Media, and Mining Hidden Business Assets. They offer free articles, white papers, and case studies at their website. Jack and Nick have been featured in The New York Times

[Image: Flickr user Tina Vega]

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