Highlights of the Issue: May 2010

May 3, 2010

COVER STORY: This Chief Means Business, by Jeff Chu page 72
Why is Admiral Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, having incognito meetings with top CEOs from Wall Street to Hollywood? America's top military adviser says it's all in the name of national security.

Look Who's Curing Cancer, by Chuck Salter, page 80
Thanks to a brilliant initiative by IBM, half a million ordinary people, such as 24-year-old college grad Lauren Moran, are changing the face of cancer, one idle computer at a time.

Fast Cities 2010, page 84
What does a Fast City look like? For this year's annual package, we found the most innovative civic programs across the nation and modeled them all into one ideal American city - from Portland's high-tech farmers markets to Oakland's hydrogen fuel-cell buses to Minneapolis's everywhere-for-everyone Wi-Fi access to Austin's car-sharing initiative.

Repeat Offenders, by Mark Borden, page 94
Meet the brash and outrageous characters behind viral marketing firm Mekanism. They have promised to do for Fast Company what they've done for the likes of Pepsi, Charles Schwab, and Toyota. Will the Web ever be the same?

Fantasy Island, by Jeff Wise, page 100
Just last year, national media outlets held up antivirus software pioneer John McAfee as a cautionary tale about the recession, because he allegedly lost his nearly $100 million fortune. Yet today, McAfee is lounging in comfort in Belize - avoiding U.S. courts, cultivating odd jungle plants, and pondering an adventure-travel business. Jeff Wise journeys to the rainforests to try separating fact from fiction.

International Virtual Assistants Day, by Dan Macsai, page 32
More than 40 years after Hal9000 from 2001: A Space Odyssey set the bar, we are still in search of one of tech's holy grails: the virtual personal assistant. A tour of its evolution.

Game(s) On, by Erica Westly, page 40
New data-rich video services are taking advantage of emerging media platforms (hello, iPad!) to give sports broadcasters a whole new level of interactivity—and die-hard fans novel ways to experience their favorite pastime.

Multiple Choice, by Farhad Manjoo, page 42
Our tech columnist dissects Google's lame launch of Buzz and finds that it's not privacy that matters, but control.

Health Care Takes the Stage, by Elizabeth Svoboda, page 48
How Kaiser Permanente went pure Hollywood, staging intricate design sets of hospital rooms, clinics, and ORs to create a patient-friendly blueprint for the future of health care.

Fast Talk: Body Language. Interviews by Stephanie Schomer, page 61
Gesture technology could be a multibillion-dollar market by 2015. The future, it turns out, is within our fingertips. A glimpse of the products and ideas that could spell the end for the remote control, the joystick, and the mouse.

Wanted, page 69
Sexy Japanese orchids for spring, chef Laurent Gras's unorthodox kitchen tools, and 3-D glasses stylish enough to make you splurge for your own pair. Plus, we steer you away from a travel bag that screams "tourist."

Roller Coasters!!! Numerology, by David Lidsky, page 112
Hold onto your stomachs! Sixty-three new coasters are expected to debut around the world this year, including two vying to be the world's most extreme. Buckle in as we paint by number the world's hottest thrill rides.

For more of the May 2010 issue of Fast Company, please visit www.fastcompany.com beginning April 21.

Media Contact:
Jocelyn Hawkes
media@fastcompany.com
212-389-5435

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