What Has Being A Thiel Fellow Given Me? Credibility

Quitting college at 18 to move to Silicon Valley and pursue your startup is the stuff of Hollywood dreams. Now add a billionaire benefactor--PayPal founder and Facebook investor Peter Thiel--bankrolling you and under pressure to prove that entrepreneurship can rival Harvard as a path to success. The inaugural class of Thiel Fellows is blogging about their experiences for Fast Company. Here, Dale Stephens discusses just what he has gained from becoming a Fellow.

Dale Stephens

When I introduce myself as a Thiel Fellow people naturally want to know about the program. Since this is the first year of the fellowship, there are many questions to answer: Do you all live together? How many were awarded? How many people applied?

These questions are relatively easy: Fellows don't live together; there are 24 fellows; more than 400 people applied.

Then people pop the hard the question, the question that is nearly impossible to answer because there's no control experiment for life.

"What has the Thiel Fellowship done for you?" people ask.

I can't answer this question definitively. It's difficult to know where I would be today had I not received the fellowship. Certainly I'd be leading UnCollege, but would I be writing a book? Would I be speaking at events? Would I be writing this blog post?

Maybe. Probably. Probably not.

Wouldn't it be awesome if life were a choose-your-ending picture book? You could relive events again and again, experimenting with different results to obtain the desired outcome.

But that's not how life works. You get one chance, for a finite amount of time (though not if Laura Deming can help it), to change the world.

One thing the Thiel Fellowship has done is accelerate my journey through the world. Life moves at rocket speed today. I don't know where I'll be next week or next month, let alone next year -- it could be Peru, South Africa, or Berlin.

The best part of the fellowship is that I now have five letters after my name -- T-H-I-E-L -- that serve as a stamp of approval in lieu of a college degree. For those fellows that left Harvard, this probably isn't as big deal. While I also went to a college that starts with an "H," when I say "I dropped out of Hendrix" people look at me quizzically, wonder momentarily whether Jimi started a college, and then dismiss me.

As a Hendrix dropout, I have no brand.

Then, when I mention that I'm Thiel Fellow, people are all ears.

Dale Stephens was homeschooled and then unschooled. Now he leads UnCollege.org. Perigee/Penguin will publish his first book about hacking your education in early 2013.

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3 Comments

  • Negrera

    I agree with both of the comments.  He didn't get into a top school--he has no right to speak about what happens at them.  Coming from Harvard, I can say there are problems...but we need the higher-educated as well.  Would I want Dale performing surgery on me? No.  Speaking at an event? No.  Publicity....

  • Mark Charters

    This is a total non-story. If you invite someone to write for you, please at least make sure s/he has got something to say first. What information of any practical use or interest is contained above?

  • Colton Pierson

    I personally find that the message Dale is sharing with Uncollege is being broken by his acceptance of the Thiel Fellowship. Students which drop out of college to drive their pursuits don't normally receive $100,000 grants to do so - Dale is no longer a representation of the case he is making, so I sadly need to ignore the majority of statement he makes with himself as the basis and instead look to other individuals doing so without such assistance.